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Catherine Coleman

Catherine Coleman

Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director of Academic Support

Last Updated: Thursday, March 9, 2017

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Telephone: (213) 740-9545
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 412

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Catherine Coleman joined USC Gould School of Law in Fall 2004 as an adjunct teaching first-year legal writing. After four years in that program, she joined the Academic Support staff in 2008 as academic support counselor and adjunct assistant professor of law. She served as interim director of Academic Support from July 2012 to February 2013 and was appointed director in March 2013.  In February 2015 she was appointed associate professor of lawyering skills and director of academic support.

Coleman counsels first-year and upper-division students on improving their academic performance and exam-taking skills. She also team-teaches the Academic Support Program's course on Legal Analysis of Evidence. Outside the Academic Support Program, she teaches the Advanced Legal Writing Practicum for upper-division students and writing-skills workshops for first-year students.

Coleman was formerly an associate, partner, managing partner and of counsel with Kinsella, Boesch, Fujikawa & Towle in Los Angeles, practicing civil litigation with the firm for 15 years. From 1980-83 she was a trial attorney with the Federal Programs Branch, Civil Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., handling cases that were the first court challenges to new federal programs. She previously clerked for the Honorable Herbert F. Murray of the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland.

A graduate of Stanford University, Coleman received her JD from Harvard University, where she was senior comments editor of the Harvard Civil Rights – Civil Liberties Law Review and published “Re-Emergence of a Controversy: Enforcing Acreage Limitation” (Harvard Environmental Law Review, 1978).

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

CNN
April 25, 2017
Re: Edward McCaffery

Edward McCaffery published an op-ed on President Donald Trump's tax plan, which is based on economic growth paying for large proposed tax cuts. According to McCaffery, instead of providing tax breaks for the richest Americans, Trump has the opportunity to ask them to share tax costs with all income brackets. "Unfortunately, it is exactly such a sensible reaction to rising economic inequality and mounting associated political concerns that sounds like voodoo these days," he wrote.

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Gillian Hadfield
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“The Problem Of Social Order: What Should We Count As Law?” Law and Social Inquiry 42 (2017): 16.

David B. Cruz
February, 2017

David B. Cruz spoke on "Equal Protection? Current Issues of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination" on a panel on "Challenges and Controversies in Constitutional Law," 2017 Central District of California Judicial Conference, La Quinta, CA.

Daniel Klerman
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“Contingent Fee Litigation in New York City,” Faculty Colloquium, University of Arizona Law School, Tucson, AZ.