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Lecturers in Law

Warren Loui

Warren Loui

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Thursday, May 18, 2017

Email:
Telephone: (213) 740-2547
Direct Line: (213) 615-1915
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 306E




Warren Loui is a partner in Winston & Strawn's Los Angeles office whose practice focuses on corporate finance, including corporate lending, securitization, and capital raising for emerging companies. He is a lecturer at the USC Gould School of Law teaching Secured Transactions.

Loui represents lenders and issuers in financings and restructurings, which have included acquisition financings up to $3.7 billion. He has particular experience in acquisition financings and the auto, entertainment, gaming and life settlement industries.

His practice is also highly concentrated on structured financings and other securitizations. His work in this area includes representation of issuers or placement agents in securitizing assets in transactions valued up to $6.5 billion, including collateralized debt obligations, prime and sub-prime automobile loans, automobile leases, dealer floor plan loans, trade receivables, Australian residential mortgages, and commercial mortgages. In addition, Loui assists investors and companies in other corporate transactions, such as capital raising for emerging middle market companies. These matters have included representing a cell phone peripherals company in its potential sale; an investor in the first-round financing of Broadcom Corporation; a Broadway theater organization in the financing of a Chinese joint venture; formation and financing work for an open-source software incubator and a 3-D animation company; and corporate planning for a security screening company.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Sun (UK)
June 27, 2017
Re: Heidi Rummel

Heidi Rummel was quoted about the likelihood of getting a conviction in a homicide case without the victim's body. "In most homicide prosecutions, the fact the person died is not the issue," Rummel said. “In the vast majority of murder cases, proving someone was a homicide victim is relatively easy with an autopsy, but without a body, prosecutors will need to prove the case with only circumstantial evidence.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

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“The Promise of a Subject-Centered Approach to Understanding Immigration Noncompliance.” Journal on Migration and Human Security 5 (2017): 285.

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2017 recipient of the Andrew Carnegie fellowship, Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program.