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Lecturers in Law

Nicole Webster

Nicole Webster

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Monday, May 22, 2017

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA




Former special assistant to the United States Secretary of the Interior and the first American Marshal (Law Clerk) in England’s High Court of Justice, Webster has represented clients in both litigation and transactional matters, for Real Property and related areas of the law, in state and federal court. Webster teaches Introduction to the U.S. Legal System, Legal Profession and U.S. Common Law Analysis and Skills in the LLM program at USC Gould School of Law. 

Concentrating on federal regulations, legislation and policy, Webster worked in the United States capital—in the U.S. Departments of the Interior, Energy and Housing and Urban Development, and in the State of California’s Washington, D.C. Office—on federal environmental and energy issues impacting California. She thereafter joined a noted international think tank, where she focused on the environmental, energy, trade and business arenas.

Webster clerked in the United States District Court, after receiving her BA from the UCLA, and JD from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, upon her admission to the California Bar. She clerked as well in the High Court of England and Wales. She subsequently served in the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, in the Major Crimes Division and latterly in the Environmental Crimes Division. Webster further is a member of the District of Columbia Bar.

A public speaker and author, Webster enjoys teaching, writing and guest speaking regarding public policy and government, real property, international and cultural property law and associated topics, in both the public and private sectors. Active in her community, she has participated as a member or officer of numerous legal advisory boards and organizations. Webster recently was elected a member of the Fellows of the American Bar Foundation—“an honorary organization of lawyers, judges and legal scholars” whose membership is “limited to less than one percent of lawyers licensed to practice in each jurisdiction.” 

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Sun (UK)
June 27, 2017
Re: Heidi Rummel

Heidi Rummel was quoted about the likelihood of getting a conviction in a homicide case without the victim's body. "In most homicide prosecutions, the fact the person died is not the issue," Rummel said. “In the vast majority of murder cases, proving someone was a homicide victim is relatively easy with an autopsy, but without a body, prosecutors will need to prove the case with only circumstantial evidence.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Emily Ryo
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“The Promise of a Subject-Centered Approach to Understanding Immigration Noncompliance.” Journal on Migration and Human Security 5 (2017): 285.

Abby K. Wood
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“Measuring the Information Benefit of Campaign Finance Disclosure,” Southern California Law and Social Science (SoCLASS) Forum, Claremont-McKenna College, Claremont, CA.

Emily Ryo
April, 2017

2017 recipient of the Andrew Carnegie fellowship, Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program.