USC Gould Search

Lecturers in Law

Daniel Yankelevits

Daniel Yankelevits

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Monday, May 22, 2017

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA




Daniel Yankelevits is Senior Vice President, Legal Affairs at Sony Pictures Entertainment in Culver City, California. His primary responsibilities include negotiating and drafting talent agreements, financing agreements, rights agreements and other agreements relating to motion picture projects (both animated and live-action). Prior to his tenure at Sony Pictures, Yankelevits was a business affairs executive in the motion picture group at DreamWorks, where he negotiated agreements relating to all aspects of many feature films, including "Catch Me If You Can" and "Win A Date with Tad Hamilton." He previously served as director of business and legal affairs at New Line Cinema, and as director of business affairs for Home Box Office (HBO), where he helped structure the deals for series such as “The Sopranos.”

Prior to teaching Entertainment Law and Industry at USC Gould School of Law, Yankelevits taught a class at UCLA Extension entitled "Negotiating Talent Agreements and Motion Picture Contracts." He is the co-author of Hollywood Dealmaking (Allworth Press, 2002), and has written several articles about the motion picture industry. He served as chairman of the Beverly Hills Bar Association, Entertainment Section, from 1998-1999 and currently is a member of the Los Angeles Copyright Society. Yankelevits also serves on the planning committee for the Institute on Entertainment Law and Business, held annually at USC.

Yankelevits earned his JD at Harvard Law School and studied Philosophy as an undergraduate at Binghamton University in New York. He began his legal career at O'Melveny & Myers in Los Angeles. 

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Sun (UK)
June 27, 2017
Re: Heidi Rummel

Heidi Rummel was quoted about the likelihood of getting a conviction in a homicide case without the victim's body. "In most homicide prosecutions, the fact the person died is not the issue," Rummel said. “In the vast majority of murder cases, proving someone was a homicide victim is relatively easy with an autopsy, but without a body, prosecutors will need to prove the case with only circumstantial evidence.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Emily Ryo
April, 2017

“The Promise of a Subject-Centered Approach to Understanding Immigration Noncompliance.” Journal on Migration and Human Security 5 (2017): 285.

Abby K. Wood
April, 2017

“Measuring the Information Benefit of Campaign Finance Disclosure,” Southern California Law and Social Science (SoCLASS) Forum, Claremont-McKenna College, Claremont, CA.

Emily Ryo
April, 2017

2017 recipient of the Andrew Carnegie fellowship, Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program.