USC Gould Search

Lecturers in Law

John Heilman

John Heilman

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Thursday, May 18, 2017

Email:
Telephone: (323) 573-7409
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 306E




John Heilman is a long-time lecturer at USC Gould School of Law. He has taught Community Property at the law school for many years. He also teaches two courses in our LLM program: Topics in American Law and Introduction to American Legal Systems. He was previously voted the Adjunct Professor of the Year at the law school.

Heilman is also an alumnus of USC. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio. He received a BS degree from Northwestern University. He moved to Southern California to attend USC Gould School of Law where he was a notes and articles editor of the Southern California Law Review. Heilman graduated from the law school in 1982. He came back to USC as a student to earn a MA in Public Administration in 2007 and subsequently a MA degree in Real Estate Development in 2009.

Heilman also teaches at Southwestern Law School where he is the Co-Director of Academic Support and Bar-Related Programs. He was recently named the first-year Professor of the Year at Southwestern.

In addition to teaching, Heilman is a long-time councilmember in the City of West Hollywood. He was actively involved in the incorporation of the city in 1984. Heilman was elected to the first City Council of West Hollywood in November 1984 and he has served on the City Council continuously since that time. He has served as Mayor of the city in 1985, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2006 and 2010.

Heilman has been an active member of the National League of Cities. He has served on the board of both the National League of Cities and the California League of Cities. He currently serves on the Legal Committee of the National League of Cities. He is a past board member of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and the Local Government Commission. He is also the past president of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Local Officials Group and past co-chair of the International Network of Lesbian and Gay Officials.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Sun (UK)
June 27, 2017
Re: Heidi Rummel

Heidi Rummel was quoted about the likelihood of getting a conviction in a homicide case without the victim's body. "In most homicide prosecutions, the fact the person died is not the issue," Rummel said. “In the vast majority of murder cases, proving someone was a homicide victim is relatively easy with an autopsy, but without a body, prosecutors will need to prove the case with only circumstantial evidence.”

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