USC Gould Search

Bryant Danner

Bryant Danner

Visiting Professor of Law

Email:
Telephone: (818) 790-5385
Fax: (818) 952-1306
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 462

Last Updated: May 23, 2017




After spending approximately 30 years at Latham & Watkins, in 1992 Bryant Danner became general counsel at Edison International, the parent company of Southern California Edison. He also served as an executive vice president of Edison International from 1996 – 2005.

While at Latham & Watkins, his areas of practice included corporate, securities, tender offers and proxy contests, litigation, insurance, and environmental law. At various times, he chaired the firm’s associates, recruiting, client relations, and operations & administration committees. During his years at Edison, Danner had responsibility for supervising a large law department and providing counseling on a wide variety of corporate governance, regulatory, litigation, and other business and policy matters.

After his retirement from Edison in 2005, Danner consulted with the company on issues relating to global warming and, in the fall of 2006, he began teaching at USC Gould School of Law. He has taught courses on “Global Warming: Law and Lessons,” “Business Organizations,” “Law Firms and In-House Law Departments: Decision Points," and “Legal Profession." 

Danner’s undergraduate degree is from Harvard College and his law degree is from Harvard Law School. He was one of the founders of the Environmental Law Section of the Los Angeles County Bar Association and was named the "Outstanding Corporate Counsel of 2003" by the Los Angeles County Bar Association’s Corporate Law Departments Section. He was a trustee of the Nature Conservancy of California, and is now on the Board of the Los Angeles Master Chorale and a member (and former Chair) of the Claremont University Consortium’s Board of Overseers.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Times
September 20, 2018
Re: Sam Erman

Sam Erman published the op-ed, "Devastation Without Representation in Puerto Rico" on colonial oppression of the territory. Under the Foraker Act of 1900, Puerto Ricans received no federal voting power, no U.S. citizenship and no guarantee of eventual statehood. This led to a gap between purported ideals of the United States and its treatment of Puerto Rico, Erman wrote."The 120-year epic tragedy of Puerto Rico can be told as a tale of two hurricanes. The one fresh in our memory is Maria, which reached Puerto Rico a year ago. The other was hurricane San Ciriaco in 1899, which devastated the island just after it became part of the United States. on colonial oppression of Puerto Rico."

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Jonathan Barnett
July, 2018

"The Certification Paradox", The Cambridge Handbook of Technical Standardization Law, Vol. 2.

Michael Simkovic
July, 2018

"Luck or Skill? Mutual Funds that Borrow," International Conference on Economic Modeling 2018, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy.

Thomas D. Lyon
June, 2018

"The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews" (with Elizabeth C. Ahern, Samantha J. Andrews & Stacia N. Stolzenberg), Journal of Interpersonal Violence 33 (2018): 2007.