USC Gould Search

Faculty in the News
USC Gould School of Law

2022-2023 Academic Year


  • Elyn Saks

    USA Today

    November 28, 2022

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was interviewed about what schizophrenia really is. "A common misconception is that we're unable to care for ourselves and that's not true," she said. "For some people it is, but not for all of us. We can have relationships –romantic and friendships. But we often don't see that (in the media) because of the emphasis on sensationalism and 'othering' us."

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    November 23, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about The National Labor Relations Board's warning that it may have to furlough workers if Congress does not add to its budget. "It would take a fully staffed NLRB and one that has funding to embark on the force of litigation and activities that the general counsel has very openly aspired to pursue," he said.

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Times

    November 21, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the dangers of grouping all non-white races into a "people of color" category. “We have talked about this a lot over the years,” he said. “I’ve always been skeptical of the ‘people of color’ category.” He considers it “potentially deleterious to the well-being of Black people.”

  • Eileen Decker

    Los Angeles Daily News

    November 18, 2022

    Re: Eileen Decker

    Eileen Decker was mentioned in an article about Sheriff-elect Robert Luna's transition team, which includes Decker, a member of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners and a former deputy U.S. attorney. Decker was also mentioned in ABC7, LAist, American Top 40 with Ryan Seacrest and The Antelope Valley Times.

  • Emily Ryo

    CNN

    November 15, 2022

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed in an article fact-checking Donald Trump's 2024 presidential campaign announcement speech. "There is no empirical basis at all for the idea that 10 million undocumented people have entered under President Biden,” she said about Trump making this claim earlier in November.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Law360

    November 14, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about how digital platforms are a minefield of potential labor violations when employers and unions use them to communicate with organizing workers. "Probably now more than ever, reasonable minds may very well differ on whether something is truly unlawful and tending to interfere with someone's rights," he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Annenberg Media ATVN

    October 27, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the hold on the construction of LA Metro's Purple Line due to numerous injuries. "LA Metro certainly has an interest in exploring this to figure out why are these things happening, what can we do to fix it and get this job done in a safe way.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    October 24, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about how warehouse workers at a California Amazon facility have withdrawn their petition for a union representation election. "I think that it is something where if momentum can be maintained by labor, they're going to perhaps not win with all of their efforts, but they're going to be able to maintain constant pressure where they make gradual gains. And that is remarkable."

  • Ariela Gross

    US News & World Report

    October 21, 2022

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was interviewed about how U.S. law schools are preparing students for racial justice work. "A basic understanding of the way that race and racism has shaped the law and that law has helped to create racial categories and distinctions is fundamental important knowledge for every lawyer to have, and therefore it should be something that every law student should be exposed to," she said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    October 20, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about how the National Labor Relations Board's top prosecutor directed field attorneys to pursue interim settlements of unfair labor practice claims rather than seek federal court orders. Lenz characterized the memo as "the NLRB's way of saying, 'We're trying to be aggressive, but we're facing budget problems.'"

  • Sarah Gruzas

    LLM Guide

    October 18, 2022

    Re: Sarah Gruzas

    Sarah Gruzas was interviewed about how online LL.M. courses lower barriers and improve access to law school. “Online learning provides a new pathway for students to access instruction and connect with other online learners in a more accessible and convenient way,” she said.

  • Jody David Armour

    CBS News Los Angeles

    October 12, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about conquering the divide between race, geography, partisanship or religion. "We gotta keep the work going, there's a lot of work still to be done. Anti-blackness runs deep," he said. "Even among my Asian students, they'll point out that darker Asians are sometimes discriminated against. We know within the Latinx community that happens. Anti-blackness is the core issue that we keep coming back to."

  • Thomas Lenz

    Schmoozin' with Forouzan

    October 11, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the defense attorney's prospective. "I work with employers in a variety of industries," he said. "I work in the perspective of helping them manage their workforce in a lawful and responsible way." Note: this is a video podcast.

  • Jody David Armour

    KPCC AirTalk

    October 10, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about Nury Martinez' resignation as City Council President after leaked recordings of racist comments. “I wouldn’t exceptionalize it … and say it’s a few bad apples," said Armour. "I think it reflects something systemic, a kind of anti-Blackness that we have to contend with in a deeper way.”

  • Jody David Armour

    FOX 11 Los Angeles

    October 10, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was cited about Nury Martinez's racist remarks against councilman Mike Bonin’s then two-year-old son. "LA has led the country in a lot of ways when it comes to racial justice," he said. "And, so now, it's really our chance to take the torch and figure out how we can translate our rhetoric about multiculturalism into a reality among different groups."

  • Robin Craig

    The American Prospect

    October 5, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about water lawsuits in Georgia. The media story line that pitted metro Atlanta residents against the oyster fishermen of Apalachicola is “a caricature,” she said. The agriculture sector is the biggest user of water in the basin. Producing roughly $2 billion in crops annually, Southwest Georgia farmers rely heavily on the Flint River. The Chattahoochee also provides water for power generators and other municipal and industrial users.

  • Robin Craig

    The Volokh Conspiracy

    October 1, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was cited in an article about Sackett v. Environmental Protection Agency, in which the Sacketts are challenging the EPA's authority to regulate the use of their land under the Clean Water Act. Even if a given parcel (such as the Sackett's property) is not part of the "waters of the United States," activities on that parcel that result in pollution reaching regulated waters could be sufficient to subject such activities to federal regulation, she said. Please note this is a citation of a blog post by Craig on the American College of Environmental Lawyers website.

  • Heidi Rummel

    KPCC AirTalk

    September 30, 2022

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel was interviewed about sentencing reform and the state of California prisons. "Almost all of the changes in sentencing laws related to people who've committed serious crimes or violent crimes in the community have a public safety component to them," she said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    USC Annenberg Media

    September 30, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about Newsom signing a law allowing California farmworkers more opportunities to unionize. “This legislation will be a game changer if it is allowed to stand as written and enacted. It won’t surprise me to see agricultural employers [or] business groups try to challenge it in court,” he said.

  • Franita Tolson

    NBC News

    September 29, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about how Chief Justice Roberts is in the spotlight as the Supreme Court tackles race cases. For Roberts, a ruling in the state’s favor would be “consistent with his view of a colorblind Constitution,” she said. “That would be devastating for minority voting rights in this country,” she added.

  • David Kirschner

    USC Annenberg Media

    September 28, 2022

    Re: David Kirschner

    David Kirschner was interviewed about USC Gould's new need-based grant assisting students from under-resourced backgrounds. “Very few private law schools offer need-based assistance,” he said. “It’s our desire to enroll as many low-income and economically challenged students as we can and providing need-based funds is a significant part of that.”

  • Andrew T. Guzman

    India Education Diary

    September 27, 2022

    Re: Andrew T. Guzman

    Dean Andrew Guzman was quoted about the USC Gould JD Class Of 2025. “This is an important time to be studying law, as there is no profession that is more essential to the success of democracy,” he said. “Even the smallest legal changes can affect the lives of so many.”

  • Michael Chasalow

    Los Angeles Business Journal

    September 26, 2022

    Re: Michael Chasalow

    Michael Chasalow was interviewed about how Beverly Crest-based educational platform Generation Genius Inc. has grown substantially, all without any venture capital backing. If startups can avoid venture capital, it’s definitely a better way to go because they are not beholden to investors, Chasalow said.

  • Jean Lantz Reisz

    The Conversation

    September 20, 2022

    Re: Jean Lantz Reisz

    Jean Reisz wrote an op-ed explaining why Ron DeSantis dropping migrants off on Martha’s Vineyard may be illegal. "Certain factors – like DeSantis’ intent and knowledge of the migrants’ immigration status – could create potential civil and criminal liability," she wrote. The op-ed also appeared in Salon, Houston Chronicle, Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Yahoo and 63 other outlets.

  • Jody David Armour

    Spectrum News 1

    September 20, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the guilty plea by former USC social work Dean Marilyn Flynn to bribery for funneling money to a nonprofit run by the son of LA City Councilmember Mark Ridley-Thomas. "If politicians are using their decision-making power to respond to bribes or undue influence from third parties, rather than the concerns of their constituents, rather than the concern of the electorate, then they’re being unfaithful to those constituents and their corruption is robbing the democratic process of integrity and the confidence of the people," Armour said.

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    The Atlantic

    September 18, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg co-wrote an op-ed arguing that private religious schools have public responsibilities too. "They should not be able to receive government funding for their private educational system while flouting minimal educational requirements—including basic English literacy—that augment but don’t upend the community’s own educational norms," she wrote. "A basic education in math and English will not undo years and years of deep exposure to biblical and rabbinic sources."

  • Jean Lantz Reisz

    Rolling Stone Magazine

    September 15, 2022

    Re: Jean Lantz Reisz

    Jean Reisz was quoted in a story noting that Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis may have violated federal law by flying immigrants to Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts. Reisz said that if the immigrants were deceived by transport organizers, the federal government could have legal standing to argue that such actions are "frustrating the government’s enforcement ability.” Interfering with government oversight of asylum seekers also could also prompt legal action, as Reisz noted that they are typically “under some kind of ICE supervision” when they appear before immigration officers and courts.

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    Daily Trojan

    September 15, 2022

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen was quoted in a story about USC Gould offering a new bachelor's degree in Legal Studies. Rasmussen noted that the degree is an important area of study whether students pursue law school or not. “Everyone who graduates from USC is going to be a leader in something — whatever that something is, law is going to affect that. If they have a nuanced appreciation for how law affects things, they can use [the major] to their advantage to be more successful in their careers and maybe help guide us to a more just and equitable society,” he said.

  • Deborah Call

    AP News

    September 6, 2022

    Re: Deborah Call

    Deborah Call was quoted in a press release about USC Gould and the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work launching two joint graduate certificates in fall 2022 focused on the intersection of law and social work. “The law has a tremendous impact on social work and social justice,” Call said. “Understanding the legal policies will help strengthen professionals’ advocacy for the individuals they serve.” The release also appeared in Yahoo!, The Bakersfield Californian, Bloomberg, The Joplin Globe, StreetInsider, Benzinga, Morningstar, The Daily News, Bluefield Daily Telegraph, The Maryville Forum, Valdosta Daily Times, Yahoo! Finance (Hong Kong), West Virginia's News, The Eagle-Tribune, Kentucky Today, The Facts, Acrofan and The Tullahoma News.

  • Jody David Armour

    KCRW

    August 29, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about a proposed California bill that protects rap lyrics and other creative expressions from being used against defendants in court cases. “The sneaking suspicion of many is that the low-hanging fruit for these kinds of cases … [is] our young Black folk, especially young Black males, who are … some of the leading architects of this genre of music, especially so-called gangsta rap," he said.

  • Clare Pastore

    Business Insider

    August 19, 2022

    Re: Clare Pastore

    Clare Pastore was interviewed about how elite law schools push students onto a 'conveyor belt' to Big Law firms. "It certainly can appear to students that everyone is getting on that conveyor belt," she said. "And they think, 'I don't know what else is out there. I think I should get on, too.'"

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    Los Angeles Times

    August 19, 2022

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen was quoted in a story about the Tom Girardi scandal and efforts of a court-appointed trustee to recoup funds and valuables allegedly misappropriated by Girardi. According to Rasmussen, the law allows a trustee to seek gifts distributed by a debtor in the four years before they entered bankruptcy. “The thought is you really shouldn’t be giving away money when it is coming out of the hide of the people to whom you owe money,” he said. “When you are insolvent, every dollar you give away is one dollar less for you to give your creditors.”

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Daily Trojan

    August 17, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg and Mark Haddad were quoted about the impacts of the Roe v. Wade overturn. “It’s basically saying this is a matter for the legislature, not the courts to decide, and that could be the federal legislature or Congress, or it could be the legislatures of individual states," said Stolzenberg. Why would we look to a tradition in which women were completely subjugated as a matter of law, in which they could not vote and they could not hold office at the time of the founding of the Constitution?” Haddad said. “Why would we look to that tradition and ask about whether it’s a reasonable guide, in this century, to decide whether to recognize this right [to abortion]?”

  • Jonathan Barnett

    The Hollywood Reporter

    August 17, 2022

    Re: Jonathan Barnett

    Jonathan Barnett was quoted in a story about recently-merged Warner Bros. Discovery shelving the HBO Max movie Batgirl, a move seen by critics as stifling diverse and inclusive programming that consumers prefer - possibly indicating too much market power for WBD under antitrust laws. “You have to ask if this combined entity has sufficient market share to act unilaterally with respect to the traditional parameters of competition, like pricing and output,” said Barnett. “You’d be concerned by some of the post-closing actions.”

  • Jody David Armour

    Daily Breeze

    August 12, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was cited in an op-ed on Proposition 31, which concerns a law that bans the sale of tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes. “Many in support of menthol cigarette bills may not recall the impact of the War on Drugs, especially on Blacks," he said. "It demonstrated how laws that invite therapeutic policing, and paternalistically protect people from their own desires, preferences, and wants have only one endgame: They pave the way to hell through good intentions by not respecting a citizen’s right to make adult choices.” Note: this article is behind a paywall.

  • Dwight Stirling

    Law.com

    August 11, 2022

    Re: Dwight Stirling

    Dwight Stirling wrote an op-ed about how the US military has clamped down on racist speech, including retweets and likes in the face of a rise of extremism within it's ranks. "The U.S. military’s revised approach to political speech prohibits retweeting or even “liking” messages that promote anti-government or white nationalist and other extremist groups," he wrote. "As a law professor who has served more than 20 years in the U.S military, I believe the broader rules will probably be upheld if challenged on First Amendment grounds." The op-ed also appeared in Yahoo! News, Source NM, Spirit of Change Magazine, Alaska Beacon, Chronicle-Tribune and Hayti. It was originally published in The Conversation.

  • Lee Epstein

    Financial Times

    August 9, 2022

    Re: Lee Epstein

    Lee Epstein wrote an op-ed about how pro-business the Roberts Court is. "Its pro-business positions do not match up with public opinion," she wrote. "If anything — and as we have seen this past term with abortion and gun rights — this Court seems willing to buck public opinion."

  • Elyn Saks

    Concord Monitor

    August 7, 2022

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was cited in an opinion piece about mental illness, alternative lifestyles and acceptance of diversity as a way to undercut stigma.

  • Jonathan Barnett

    Law360

    August 5, 2022

    Re: Jonathan Barnett

    Jonathan Barnett wrote an op-ed warning against a trend by investors and regulators to over-value the market power of Big Tech platforms. "Technology history casts doubt on the staying power of the lock-in effects that support any economically rational justification for proposed regulatory interventions in platform markets. If antitrust law is to be based on fact and evidence, rather than rhetoric and narrative, legislators and regulators who are keen to intervene may be wise to hit the pause button," Barnett wrote.

  • Lee Epstein

    Axios

    August 4, 2022

    Re: Lee Epstein

    Lee Epstein's research was cited in an article about the most pro-business Supreme Court ever. "The new data shows a degree of pro-business sentiment today far exceeding even the pre-Depression highs," the article read.

  • John Matsusaka

    Politico

    August 4, 2022

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka wrote an op-ed arguing to let the people decide on the issue of abortion. "Ultimately, our system is only strengthened when the people have a say in how they are governed," he said.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Los Angeles Times

    August 3, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Ed Kleinbard was quoted about the luxury buildings in LA in the midst of homeless tents. "As USC professor Ed Kleinbard argued in my column on the $35-million tear-down, real estate is a big factor in wealth inequality, and the government subsidizes home ownership through various tax credits and deductions," read the article.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Hill

    July 27, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Seth Stodder wrote an op-ed about how the new national gun law doesn’t come close to addressing the danger. "For example, Uvalde suspect Salvador Ramos, a troubled kid with a history of violent threats — but no criminal record — was able to buy two AR-15s, and he would still have been allowed to do so under the new law," he wrote.

  • Clare Pastore

    ABA Journal

    July 26, 2022

    Re: Clare Pastore

    Clare Pastore was interviewed about the potential risks and rewards for law firms aiding staffers to secure abortions in a post-Dobbs world. “It’s unbelievable, staggering and inflammatory to openly call lawyers murderers, and it hands to Sidley on a silver platter standing to challenge Texas’ anti-abortion law," she said.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    American Constitution Society

    July 19, 2022

    Re: Julie Werner-Simon

    Julie Werner wrote a blog post about how the recent Supreme Court cases have changed what she tells law students about the Supreme Court. "These five decisions over the last eight days of the term have changed how I view the high court and how I will talk about the Supreme Court of my time," she wrote.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Spectrum News 1

    July 15, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about a union representing concession workers at Dodger stadium's decision not to strike during the All-Star Game. "I think that management is going to want to avoid anything that would be disruptive, and they certainly want to keep the employees happy, particularly when you have long-term, dedicated workers," he said.

  • Scott Altman

    The Hill

    July 13, 2022

    Re: Scott Altman

    Scott Altman authored an opinion piece on how distrust in science and government, a factor in political divisions today, has damaged the balance of parental decision-making and government intervention, and the importance of respect for good-faith differences in restoring that balance for the sake of vulnerable children, especially LGBTQ children whose parents seek supportive therapy for them. “With sensible boundaries and mutual understanding, we can hope to re-establish trust and de-escalate from war to respectful engagement,” he writes.

  • Michael Simkovic

    The Hill

    July 9, 2022

    Re: Michael Simkovic

    Michael Simkovic wrote an op-ed about how the polarizing effects of the culture wars distract from more important issues facing the nation, and can be alleviated by focusing on public investment, especially in less developed parts of the country: “The time, energy and money that have been spent arguing about whether Missouri’s abortion laws should be adopted by Illinois or vice-versa could better be spent improving the speed and frequency of trains connecting St. Louis to Chicago,” he writes.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    July 6, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about how more workers are opting to organize without the formal backing of established unions following the upstart Amazon Labor Union's landmark election win. However, "A small, grassroots union is not going to have or is not likely to have the resources to encourage employees to stay out for any length of time," Lenz said.

  • Franita Tolson

    Reason

    July 6, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was mentioned in an article about National Constitution Center released its series of reports on "Restoring the Guardrails of Democracy," for which she co-authored the Team Progressive report.

  • Alexander Capron

    Daily Beast

    July 6, 2022

    Re: Alexander Capron

    Alex Capron was interviewed about the scientific line between life and death. Without a universal standard, Capron argued, death in the United States could become a legal and ethical hodgepodge, with different criteria in different states.

  • Lee Epstein

    The New York Times

    July 5, 2022

    Re: Lee Epstein

    Lee Epstein was quoted in a story about the six-justice conservative majority in the U.S. Supreme Court, handing down decisions that have had a powerful impact on American life, with some calling the current court the most conservative since 1931. “The data provide stunning confirmation of the Republican-conservative takeover of the Supreme Court,” Epstein said.

  • Gregory Keating

    Courthouse News Service

    July 5, 2022

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed about two new pieces of legislation allowing private rights of action against gun manufacturers and dealers in California. “AB 1594 just broadens the rights of individuals to go after manufacturers and dealers who sell and distribute guns that are illegal under California law,” he said. “It does not take away the right for people to own guns.”

  • Lee Epstein

    The New York Times

    July 1, 2022

    Re: Lee Epstein

    Lee Epstein was quoted in a story about the six-justice majority on the U.S. Supreme Court, which has handed down decisions with a powerful impact on Americans and is considered by some the most conservative court since 1931. “The data provide stunning confirmation of the Republican-conservative takeover of the Supreme Court,” Epstein said.

  • Franita Tolson

    WisEye

    July 1, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about the Voting Rights Act and redistricting law. "Even if we could envision a democracy where the independent state legislature doctrine will be enacted in this good faith way, I think 2020 taught us that in the times that the doctrine came up, it was in undemocratic situations," she said.

  • Robin Craig

    The Orange County Register

    July 1, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about the push by local House democrats for EPA to strengthen air and water quality rules. Remove all lead service lines from public water systems within a decade at no cost to property owners, set acceptable levels of lead at 5 parts per billion at the tap, and increase testing for lead in water. Such rules are in the works, Craig said. “It becomes a bit of a Catch-22 in the absence of significant federal money to help with the upgrades,” she said, requiring coordinated infrastructure legislation to make it plausible. Note this article is behind a paywall.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

USA Today
November 28, 2022
Re: Elyn Saks

Elyn Saks was interviewed about what schizophrenia really is. "A common misconception is that we're unable to care for ourselves and that's not true," she said. "For some people it is, but not for all of us. We can have relationships –romantic and friendships. But we often don't see that (in the media) because of the emphasis on sensationalism and 'othering' us."

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Mugambi Jouet
October, 2022

“Guns, Mass Incarceration, and Bipartisan Reform: Beyond Vicious Circle and Social Polarization,” Arizona State Law Journal (Forthcoming 2023).

Hannah R. Garry
October, 2022

"From Policy back to Principles? Refugee Protection under International Law & State (Non)-Compliance," introductory remarks and chair of roundtable discussion, ABILA International Law Weekend, Fordham Law School, Oct. 21, 2022.

D. Daniel Sokol
October, 2022

“Cookie Intermediaries: Does Competition Lead to More Privacy? Evidence from the Dark Web,” University of Toronto Law and Economics Workshop, Toronto, Canada, October 2022.