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Abby K. Wood

Abby K. Wood

Associate Professor of Law, Political Science and Public Policy

Email:
Telephone: (213) 740-8012
Fax: (213) 740-5502
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 434
Personal Website: Link
Google Scholar Profile: Link
SSRN Author Page: Link

Download Curriculum Vitae

Last Updated: October 31, 2019




Abby Wood’s research is at the intersection of law and politics. Wood uses sophisticated quantitative analysis to examine the causal effects of institutional changes on human behavior. Her current projects analyze what voters learn from campaign finance disclosures, whether transparency can affect donor decision-making, and patterns in congressional oversight of agency activity. Recent projects examine the Freedom of Information Act and agency politicization, regulating false political speech on social media and the effects of Citizens United v. FEC on political donors.

Wood teaches administrative law, campaign finance and analytical methods for lawyers. She has taught on a variety of subjects, including international human rights law, constitutional law, quantitative methods for political science and comparative politics. In addition to teaching at USC, Wood has taught at the University of Chicago Law School.

From 2015 to 2017, Wood served on the Federal Bipartisan Campaign Finance Task Force. Before joining USC Gould, Wood clerked for the Honorable John T. Noonan, judge of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. She also has consulted on good governance projects in association with USAID, World Bank, National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and UNDP. 

Wood holds a BA from Austin College, a JD from Harvard Law School, an MA in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and a PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Works in Progress

  • “Mind the (Participation) Gap: Vouchers, Voting, and Visibility” (with Christopher Elmendorf and Douglas Spencer). - (SSRN)
  • "Show Me the Money: 'Dark Money' and the Informational Benefit of Campaign Finance Disclosure" - (SSRN)
  • “Campaign Finance Transparency Affects Legislative Candidate Performance at the Polls” (with Christian Grose).
  • “Bureaucratic Agency Problems and Legislative Oversight” (with Sean Gailmard and Janna Rezaee).

Articles and Book Chapters

  • "Randomized experiments by government institutions and American political development," (with C.R. Grose). Public Choice (2019)  - (www)
  • “Polling Place Practices” in The Future of Election Administration: Cases and Conversations (Mitchell Brown, Kathleen Hale and Bridgett A. King, eds.) (Palgrave, 2019). - (www)
  • "Waiting to Vote in the 2016 Presidential Election: Evidence from a Multi-county Study," (with Robert M. Stein and others), Political Research Quarterly (2019) - (www)
  • "Elite Political Ignorance: Law, Data, and the Representation of (Mis)Perceived Electorates" (with Christopher S. Elmendorf). UC Davis Law Review 52 (2018): 571.  - (SSRN) - (Hein)
  • "Pedagogical Value of Polling-Place Observation By Students" (with Christopher B. Mann, et al.). PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (2018): 831 - (www)
  • "Campaign Finance Disclosure." Annual Review of Law and Social Science 14 (2018): 11. - (www)
  • "Fool Me Once: Regulating 'Fake News' and other Online Advertising" (with Ann M. Ravel). Southern California Law Review  91 (2018): 1223. - (SSRN) - (Hein) - (www)
  • “Agency Performance Challenges and Agency Politicization” (with David E. Lewis). Journal of Public Administration, Research, and Theory 27 (2017): 581 . - (www) - (SSRN)
  • "Twombly and Iqbal at the State Level" (with Roger M. Michalski). Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 14, no. 2 (2017): 424. - (SSRN) - (www)
  • “In the Shadows of Sunlight: The Effects of Transparency on State Political Campaigns” (with Douglas M. Spencer). Election Law Journal 15, no. 4 (2016): 302. - (SSRN) - (www)
  • "Caught in the Act but not Punished: On Elite Rule of Law and Deterrence" (with Francesca R. Jensenius). Penn State Journal of International Law & Policy 4, no. 2 (2016): 686 (peer reviewed). - (SSRN) - (Hein)
  • “Citizens United, States Divided: An Empirical Analysis of Independent Political Spending”, with Douglas Spencer. Indiana Law Journal 89 (2014): 315. - (SSRN) - (Hein) - (www)
  • “Charm and Punishment: How the Philippines’ Leading Man Became Its Most Famous Prisoner.” In Prosecuting Heads of State, edited by Ellen Lutz and Caitlin Reiger. Cambridge University Press, 2009. - (www)

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Washington Post
December 2, 2019
Re: Jonathan Handel

Jonathan Handel was quoted on Pete Davidson's nondisclosure agreement for attending his comedy shows, barring the audience from speaking about his shows. Handel mentioned that successfully suing a random fan for $1 million would be nearly impossible. “The optics of going to court and suing one of your fans is really pretty ugly,” Handel said. “It would be foolish to do that.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Scott Altman
October, 2019

"Are Boycotts, Shunning, and Shaming Corrupt?” Legal Theory Workshop, University of Virginia Law School, Charlottesville, VA.

Gregory Keating
October, 2019

Gregory Keating’s paper, “Is Tort Law ‘Private’?” was reviewed by Ellen Bublick as a significant work of scholarship relating to Tort Law in JOTWELL: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots), on October 15, 2019.

Dan Simon
October, 2019

“Confessions True and False,” Korean Society for Criminal Law, Yonsei University Law School, Seoul, South Korea.