USC Gould Search

Jeesoo Nam
USC Gould School of Law

Jeesoo Nam

Assistant Professor of Law and Philosophy

Email:
Telephone: (213-821-8259)
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 447
SSRN Author Page: Link

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Last Updated: June 3, 2022




Jeesoo Nam’s research covers the intersection between philosophy and a variety of issues in tax law, criminal law, and statutory interpretation.

Nam applies the framework of responsibility and desert to important questions of tax policy, such as the taxation of capital income, the progressivity of tax rates, and the availability of deductions for losses and expenses. In criminal law, Nam analyzes the conditions under which those who committed crimes should nevertheless be exempt from punishment, focusing on the topics of excuse and fair notice. Nam’s research in statutory interpretation concerns various issues raised by the linguistic phenomenon of vagueness. His research also considers how these three doctrinal areas interact with one another, for example, the application of the rule of lenity (a criminal canon of statutory interpretation) to the tax law.

Before joining USC, Nam served as visiting assistant professor of tax law at New York University. Nam received a JD from Yale Law School and a bachelor's with highest distinction, Phi Beta Kappa, from Duke University, where he majored in philosophy and economics. Nam has received the Felix S. Cohen Prize in legal philosophy. Nam practiced law as a tax associate in Los Angeles at Latham & Watkins.
 

Articles

  • "Lenity and the Meaning of Statutes," 96 Southern California Law Review (forthcoming 2022). 
  • "Taxing Option Luck," 11 U.C. Irvine Law Review 1067 (2021). - (www)
  • "Biomedical Enhancements as Justice," 29 Bioethics 126 (2015). - (www)

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Bloomberg Government
June 22, 2022
Re: Franita Tolson

Franita Tolson was interviewed about how federal lawsuits from North Carolina, Alabama, and Arkansas test the limits of the Voting Rights Act, the boundaries of state government authority, and the ability of voting rights groups to file racial gerrymandering cases. “These doctrines and approaches in these cases fundamentally reset the rules of the game,” she said. “In 2030 we will live in a completely different world than we lived in in 2020, and 2020 was not favorable to minority voters at all.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Robin Craig
March, 2022

"Saltwater Sovereignty: Tribal Marine Management Authority Along the Pacific Coast.” Online Environmental Law Workshop. University of Maryland School of Law, Baltimore, MD.

Daniel Klerman
March, 2022

“Comment on Choi, Erickson, & Pritchard, ‘Coalitions among Plaintiffs’ Attorneys in Securities Class Actions’,” Conference on Empirical Legal Studies, Virtual, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Robin Craig
March, 2022

“Who’s on First? The Mind-Blowing Attempt to Conceptualize Deference in the Midst of Decision Delays and Agency Repeals,” J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Environmental Law Symposium for the George Washington University School of Law, Virtual, Washington, D.C.