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Dan Nabel

Dan Nabel

Lecturer in Law

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA

Last Updated: November 15, 2019




Dan Nabel currently practices law in-house at Riot Games. He teaches “Video Game Law” at the USC Gould School of Law and co-authored Video Game Law in a Nutshell (West Academic, 2018). Nabel began his career as a litigator at Greenberg Glusker Fields Claman & Machtinger, LLP in Century City. While in private practice, Nabel successfully litigated dozens of cases and counseled clients on a wide range of topics, including real estate, business and intellectual property. He also published more than 50 articles in the Daily Journal and other trade publications.

Prior to joining Riot Games, Nabel directed the Intellectual Property & Technology Law Clinic at USC Gould. While directing the clinic, he supervised law students in public interest cases as they counseled and represented policymakers, artists, film-makers, innovators, game-makers, non-profit organizations and others on a range of intellectual property and technology issues. Under Nabel’s direction, the clinic successfully obtained the first-ever Digital Millennium Copyright Act exemption for the repair of agricultural machinery, as part of the U.S. Copyright Office’s triennial Section 1201 rule-making proceeding.

Nabel serves as a Trustee for the Los Angeles Copyright Society and has a strong commitment to public interest work. He has provided pro bono legal services to numerous clients of the Alliance for Children’s Rights and Public Counsel in adoption, immigration, fraud and elder abuse cases. Nabel also serves as chair of the advisory council for CASA of Los Angeles — an organization dedicated to improving the lives of neglected and abused foster children with trained volunteer advocates.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Bloomberg Tax
September 22, 2020
Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

Nomi Stolzenberg was quoted in an article about whether or not religious judges can keep their faith separate from their rulings. Stolzenberg said, “[Amy Barrett] is being selected to fulfill a half century campaign to take back the courts, to return religion to the public square, to dismantle a style of secularist constitutional interpretation that religious conservatives find objectionable."

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Jonathan Barnett
July, 2020

"Lessons from Luckin Coffee: The Underappreciated Risks of Variable Interest Entities," Columbia Law School Blue Sky Blog, July 28, 2020.

Jonathan Barnett
July, 2020

"Big is not necessarily bad," The Hill, July 30, 2020.

Edward McCaffery
July, 2020

“The Death of the Income Tax (or, The Rise of America's Universal Wage Tax),” Indiana Law Journal  95 (2020): 1233.