USC Gould Search

Dan Nabel

Dan Nabel

Lecturer in Law

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA

Last Updated: November 15, 2019




Dan Nabel currently practices law in-house at Riot Games. He teaches “Video Game Law” at the USC Gould School of Law and co-authored Video Game Law in a Nutshell (West Academic, 2018). Nabel began his career as a litigator at Greenberg Glusker Fields Claman & Machtinger, LLP in Century City. While in private practice, Nabel successfully litigated dozens of cases and counseled clients on a wide range of topics, including real estate, business and intellectual property. He also published more than 50 articles in the Daily Journal and other trade publications.

Prior to joining Riot Games, Nabel directed the Intellectual Property & Technology Law Clinic at USC Gould. While directing the clinic, he supervised law students in public interest cases as they counseled and represented policymakers, artists, film-makers, innovators, game-makers, non-profit organizations and others on a range of intellectual property and technology issues. Under Nabel’s direction, the clinic successfully obtained the first-ever Digital Millennium Copyright Act exemption for the repair of agricultural machinery, as part of the U.S. Copyright Office’s triennial Section 1201 rule-making proceeding.

Nabel serves as a Trustee for the Los Angeles Copyright Society and has a strong commitment to public interest work. He has provided pro bono legal services to numerous clients of the Alliance for Children’s Rights and Public Counsel in adoption, immigration, fraud and elder abuse cases. Nabel also serves as chair of the advisory council for CASA of Los Angeles — an organization dedicated to improving the lives of neglected and abused foster children with trained volunteer advocates.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Washington Post
December 2, 2019
Re: Jonathan Handel

Jonathan Handel was quoted on Pete Davidson's nondisclosure agreement for attending his comedy shows, barring the audience from speaking about his shows. Handel mentioned that successfully suing a random fan for $1 million would be nearly impossible. “The optics of going to court and suing one of your fans is really pretty ugly,” Handel said. “It would be foolish to do that.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Scott Altman
October, 2019

"Are Boycotts, Shunning, and Shaming Corrupt?” Legal Theory Workshop, University of Virginia Law School, Charlottesville, VA.

Gregory Keating
October, 2019

Gregory Keating’s paper, “Is Tort Law ‘Private’?” was reviewed by Ellen Bublick as a significant work of scholarship relating to Tort Law in JOTWELL: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots), on October 15, 2019.

Dan Simon
October, 2019

“Confessions True and False,” Korean Society for Criminal Law, Yonsei University Law School, Seoul, South Korea.