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Jonathan Libby

Jonathan Libby

Lecturer in Law

Email:
Telephone: (213) 894-2905
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 411A

Last Updated: July 17, 2019




Jonathan D. Libby has been a deputy federal public defender in the Central District of California (Los Angeles) since January of 2003 focusing on appeals and habeas corpus work. He previously worked at the federal defender office in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) and in private criminal defense practice in New York. He has argued more than 85 federal appeals, including cases before the Second, Third, and Ninth Circuit Courts of Appeals, and successfully argued United States v. Alvarez in the United States Supreme Court in which the Court held, 6-3, that the “Stolen Valor Act” – which made it a crime to falsely claim receipt of a military medal – was facially unconstitutional under the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment.

Libby has been a lecturer in law at USC Gould School of Law since 2012 where he had taught both first-year legal writing and advocacy and an upper-division course in advanced appellate advocacy.

He has also served as Chair of the State Bar of California’s Client Security Fund Commission which reimburses legal consumers who have lost money or property due to theft or an equivalent dishonest act committed by a California lawyer acting in a professional capacity, among other bar activities. He received his BA in Journalism in 1993 from Temple University, where he served as student body president, and his JD in 1996 from The City University of New York School of Law where he served as Editor-in-Chief of the New York City Law Review and was a member of the school's National Moot Court team. He is a member of the California, New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey bars.

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Bloomberg Tax
September 22, 2020
Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

Nomi Stolzenberg was quoted in an article about whether or not religious judges can keep their faith separate from their rulings. Stolzenberg said, “[Amy Barrett] is being selected to fulfill a half century campaign to take back the courts, to return religion to the public square, to dismantle a style of secularist constitutional interpretation that religious conservatives find objectionable."

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Jonathan Barnett
July, 2020

"Lessons from Luckin Coffee: The Underappreciated Risks of Variable Interest Entities," Columbia Law School Blue Sky Blog, July 28, 2020.

Jonathan Barnett
July, 2020

"Big is not necessarily bad," The Hill, July 30, 2020.

Edward McCaffery
July, 2020

“The Death of the Income Tax (or, The Rise of America's Universal Wage Tax),” Indiana Law Journal  95 (2020): 1233.