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Lecturers in Law

Jack Goetz

Jack Goetz

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Wednesday, June 28, 2017

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA




Jack Goetz is a lecturer in law at USC Gould School of Law. He was the Academic Lead for a 100-hour mediation training certificate program that he created in 2009 and then taught for 7 years at the California State University campuses in Northridge and Dominguez Hills. Goetz additionally serves the educational community by periodically chairing on-site accreditation teams that visit various universities around the world.

As a neutral, Goetz serves the public privately as well as serving on various public panels, including serving as an arbitrator and mediator and now Vice-Chair for the Los Angeles County Bar Association (LACBA) Attorney-Client Mediation and Arbitration Services, an arbitrator for the Financial Industry Regulatory Association (FINRA), and a mediator for the Ventura County Superior Court. He is a board member for the California Academy of Mediation Professionals and SCMA. The Los Angeles Superior Court Alternative Dispute Resolution Program honored him as the 2011 “Outstanding Volunteer” for his service to the courts.

Goetz has advocated for strengthening public protection in mediation as well as social justice issues associated with greater widespread public access to qualified mediators, and currently serves as the Chair for the Southern California Mediation Association (SCMA) Business Committee on Voluntary Mediator Certification. Goetz additionally serves as a member of the California State Bar Committee on Alternative Dispute Resolution.

Goetz received his PhD in Education at Capella University (2006), his JD at Boston University (1979), his MBA at Pepperdine University (1990), and his BA in Economics at San Diego State University (1976).
 

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The Sun (UK)
June 27, 2017
Re: Heidi Rummel

Heidi Rummel was quoted about the likelihood of getting a conviction in a homicide case without the victim's body. "In most homicide prosecutions, the fact the person died is not the issue," Rummel said. “In the vast majority of murder cases, proving someone was a homicide victim is relatively easy with an autopsy, but without a body, prosecutors will need to prove the case with only circumstantial evidence.”

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