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Thomas D. Griffith

Thomas D. Griffith

John B. Milliken Professor of Taxation

Email:
Telephone: (213) 740-2533
Fax: (213) 740-5502
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 426
SSRN Author Page: Link

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Last Updated: September 4, 2019




Thomas D. Griffith specializes in studies of income tax and in criminal law. He teaches Contracts, Corporate Taxation, Criminal Law, Topics in Criminology and Federal Income Taxation.

Griffith is the author of Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt, Aspen Law & Business, 2002); “Gangs, Schools and Stereotypes” (with Linda S. Beres, Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review, 2004); and “Progressive Taxation and Happiness” (“The State of Federal Income Tax Symposium: Rates, Progressivitiy, and Budget Processes,” Boston College Law Review, 2004).

A magna cum laude graduate of Brown University and Harvard Law School, Griffith was an editor on the Harvard Law Review and was an associate at Hill & Barlow in Boston, MA, before joining the USC Gould School of Law faculty in 1984. He also taught at New York University. He is a past subcommittee chair of the American Bar Association Committee of Problems of Low Income Taxpayers and lecturer at the USC Tax Institute. In 2009, Griffith received the William A. Rutter Distinguished Teaching Award.

Books

  • Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations, 7th ed. (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt) (Wolters Kluwer Law & Business, 2014).
  • Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations, 5th ed. (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt) (Aspen Publishers, 2008).
  • Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations, 4th ed. (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt) (Aspen Publishers, 2005).
  • Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations, 3d ed. (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt) (Aspen Law & Business, 2002).
  • Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations, 2d ed. (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt) (Aspen Law & Business, 1998).
  • Federal Income Tax: Examples and Explanations (with Joseph Bankman and Katherine Pratt) (Little Brown & Co., 1996).

Articles and Book Chapters

  • "Gangs, Schools and Stereotypes" (with Linda S. Beres). 37 Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review 935 (2004). - (Hein)
  • "Progressive Taxation and Happiness" (The State of Federal Income Tax Symposium: Rates, Progressivity, and Budget Processes). 45 Boston College Law Review 1363 (2004). - (Hein)
  • "Taxing Sunny Days: Adjusting Taxes for Regional Living Costs and Amenities" (with Michael S. Knoll). 116 Harvard Law Review 987 (2003). - (Hein)
  • "Habitual Offender Statutes and Criminal Deterrence" (with Linda S. Beres). 34 Connecticut Law Review 55 (2001). - (Hein)
  • "Demonizing Youth" (with Linda S. Beres). 34 Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review 747 (2001). - (Hein)
  • "Diversity and the Law School." 74 Southern California Law Review 169 (2000). - (Hein)
  • "Did 'Three Strikes' Cause the Recent Drop in California Crime?: An Analysis of the California Attorney General's Report" (with Linda S. Beres). 32 Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review 101 (1998). - (Hein)
  • "Do Three Strikes Laws Make Sense? Habitual Offender Statutes and Criminal Incapacitation" (with Linda S. Beres). 87 Georgetown Law Journal 103 (1998). - (Hein)
  • "Efficient Taxation of Mixed Personal and Business Expenses." 41 UCLA Law Review 1769 (1994). - (Hein)
  • "Should 'Tax Norms' be Abandoned? Rethinking Tax Policy Analysis and the Taxation of Personal Injury Recoveries." 1993 Wisconsin Law Review 1115. - (Hein)
  • "Tribute to David Carroll" (with others). 67 Southern California Law Review 1 (1993). - (Hein)
  • "Is the Debate Between an Income Tax and a Consumption Tax a Debate About Risk? Does it Matter?" (with Joseph Bankman). 47 Tax Law Review 377 (1992). - (Hein)
  • "Theories of Personal Deductions in the Income Tax." 40 Hastings Law Journal 343 (1989). - (Hein)
  • "Social Welfare and the Rate Structure: A New Look at Progressive Taxation" (with J. Bankman). 75 California Law Review 1905 (1987). - (Hein)

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

KPCC Air Talk
November 18, 2019
Re: Camille Gear Rich

Camille Gear Rich participated in a discussion on KPCC Air Talk about free speech. “I think we’re entering an era in which people are much more aware of the need for some protection, some regulation in terms of how speech is orchestrated, that government is in a position where it’s trying to create conditions where a variety of speakers with different sensitivities can participate in public debate. So when it says “Congress shall make no law,” there are all sorts of ways in which we have historically carved out particular things, particular areas, where there is a need for regulation … there is a need for let’s say, speed bumps, or containers … where there are certain kinds of speech that are so coercive to public debate or dangerous for other reasons that we impose some limitations and we’ve created definitions around obscenity, around threats, around fighting words, to try to create those conditions that really will allow for a truly participatory and rich conversation,” Rich said.

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Nomi Stolzenberg
July, 2019

Nomi Stolzenberg, "Anne Dailey and the New Fictionalism," 36th Annual Congress of Law and Mental Health, Rome, Italy.

Thomas D. Lyon
July, 2019

"Effects of the Putative Confession Instruction on Perceptions of Children's True and False Statements" (with Jennifer Gongola and Nicholas Scurich), Applied Cognitive Psychology 33 (2019): 655.

Thomas D. Lyon
July, 2019

"Children’s Concealment of a Minor Transgression: The Role of Age, Maltreatment, and Executive Functioning" (with Shanna Williams and Kelly McWilliams), Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.