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Amber Kennedy Madole
USC Gould School of Law

Amber Kennedy Madole

Law Librarian, Research Services, Indigenous Law and Policy, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law

Email:
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 203B

Last Updated: February 24, 2022




Amber Madole serves as law librarian for research services and Indigenous law and policy and adjunct assistant professor of law at the USC Gould School of Law. In these roles, she teaches legal research courses and assists faculty and students with their legal research endeavors.

Madole earned her undergraduate degree at Georgetown University in immigration policy and regional studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service. While at Georgetown, she worked for U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman in both the D.C. and New Mexico offices and established a book sharing program between the Library of Congress and rural New Mexico libraries.

During law school, Madole was the managing editor of the Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance. She spent time at a midsize immigration law firm and clerked for the State Bar of California, the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office, and the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.

Madole is active in the Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL), having served on the executive board and chairing the Speakers Committee for the annual SCALL Institute.

Madole has a special dedication to the study of Indigenous law and policy issues. She is the author of California Tribal Law in Henke's California Law Guide. Her joint proposal promoting the inclusion of tribal codes in the Bluebook was sponsored by ALL-SIS, the academic special interest section for the American Association of Law Libraries. She is a citizen of the Chiricahua Fort Sill Apache Tribe and a member of the State Bar of California. 

Articles and Book Chapters

  • "California Tribal Law," in Henke's California Law Guide (Daniel W. Martin, ed.) (Matthew Bender, 2006).

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Law360
May 18, 2022
Re: Elyn Saks

Elyn Saks was quoted in a story on state bar questionnaires that include questions about mental health, with some states deciding to eliminate such questions. "It may be that things are changing around the mental health story, and it may even be that COVID is helpful," she said. "It's kind of a silver lining that more people have experienced anxiety and depression and fear because of COVID, and may be able to empathize more with people who feel those things because of conditions." Story is behind paywall.

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Ariela Gross
March, 2022

“Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana,” Centre International de Recherches sur les Esclavages at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France.

Camille Gear Rich
March, 2022

“No More Boxes to Check: Imagining The Anti-Racist Law Firm,” NALP Annual Education Conference, New Orleans, LA.

Thomas D. Lyon
March, 2022

“Disclosure Among Child Abuse Victims” (with K. London and M. Eisen), Fourth Zoom Psychology and Law Symposium: Children in Legal Settings, Maastrict University, Maastricht, Netherlands.