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Dara Barker

Dara Barker

Lecturer in Law

Email:
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA

Last Updated: August 16, 2018




Dara K. Barker, is an attorney specializing in the area of juvenile law, both dependency and delinquency, and in family law. Barker developed, implemented and administered court policies and programs designed to improve the functioning of the juvenile court and the lives of dependents and wards under juvenile court jurisdiction. As an attorney for the Children’s Law Center of Los Angeles, and as a minor’s counsel in family court, she represented numerous foster children and children in the middle of highly contested custody and visitation proceedings. She also served as a parenting plan coordinator and represented fost-adopt parents.

Barker earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania and her law degree from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. She taught juvenile law in the Children’s Rights Fellow program at Whittier Law School and taught at the UCLA School of Law. She co-authored a law review article, published in the William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal, entitled “A Child-Centered Response to the Elkins Family Law Task Force.”

Barker sits on the board of the United Friends of the Children. Barker has been a foster parent herself and adopted a child from the foster care system.
 

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Times
December 12, 2018
Re: Rob Saltzman

Rob Saltzman was interviewed on the necessity of public trust of the police, saying that "It is important people have confidence in the system that police are acting constitutionally."

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Sam Erman
September, 2018

Sam Erman wrote an op-ed, "Devastation Without Representation in Puerto Rico," posted to The Los Angeles Times on September 20, 2018.

Gregory Keating
September, 2018

"Principles of Risk Imposition and the Priority of Avoiding Harm," Revus [Online] (2018).

Jody David Armour
September, 2018

"Where Bias Lives in the Criminal Law and its Processes: How Judges and Jurors Socially Construct Black Criminals," American Journal of Criminal Law 45 (2018): 203.