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Faculty & Gould School of Law in the News

USC Gould professors are frequently sought by the media to serve as legal experts. This section highlights news citations in which USC Gould faculty are quoted and USC Gould is featured in stories.

  • Michael Brennan

    Associated Press

    February 11, 2016

    Re: Michael Brennan

    Michael Brennan was quoted about a legal case involving a man who allegedly abducted his wife when she was 15 and forcing her to stay with him for a decade. “The defense is going to throw out whatever they can in terms of trying to convince a jury she really was there voluntarily,” Brennan said. “I just don’t think it is going to have very much appeal.”

  • Josh Lockman

    The Los Angeles Times

    February 5, 2016

    Re: Josh Lockman

    Josh Lockman was quoted about loosening sanctions against Iran. "We still have sanctions on the table due to Iran's sponsorship of terrorism," Lockman said. "Businesses in Iran will still benefit, but it's far-fetched to say this is a wide opening. We are a long ways away from the normalization of ties, unless there's a change in the regime's behavior."

  • Gregory Keating

    Asian Journal

    February 5, 2016

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was quoted about how those affected by the Aliso Canyon gas leak could seek damages from the gas company. “It seems there are also grounds for claims of negligence against the gas company since the leaking well’s subsurface safety valve, which was not required by law but could have stopped the leaking fumes, was reportedly removed decades ago and never replaced,” Keating said. “But determining how much injury residents will suffer beyond months of relocation with regard to home prices and any potential serious health effects will be more challenging.”

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Washington Post

    February 4, 2016

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted in a column by Allan Sloan about a complicated deal involving U.S.-based Johnson Controls Inc. combining with Tyco International PLC, which is based in Ireland for tax purposes. The deal takes advantage of a loophole that gives the company more tax leeway if the shareholders of the U.S. company own between 50 and 60 percent of the combined company. “Congress drew the 60 percent line when it enacted the statute,” Kleinbard said. “There’s no fundamental economic explanation for that decision... . I am not aware of any history that explains why Congress drew the inversion line at 60 percent.”

  • Gregory Keating

    Los Angeles Daily News

    February 2, 2016

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Greg Keating was quoted about lawsuits adding pressure to the Southern California Gas Company, which operates a leaking gas well at Porter Ranch, in the wake of criminal charges filed against the company. “It does increase the pressure on the gas company because they are under fire from more government agencies now,” he said. “The more pressure they are under politically, the more reason they have to address residents’ concerns now rather than kick the can down the road by litigating for years.”

  • Sam Erman

    History News Network

    January 31, 2016

    Re: Sam Erman

    Sam Erman wrote an op-ed in conjunction with Nathan Rose-Perenthal of the USC History department about why Ted Cruz, who was born in Canada to a U.S. citizen mother, is constitutionally qualified as a "natural born citizen" to be president. "To choose a side in this two hundred year old dispute, we look to the modern Constitution’s core values," Erman wrote. "These values lead us to favor the more expansive eighteenth-century meaning of 'natural born' — and so to believe, though not without some regret, that Ted Cruz is indeed eligible for the presidency."

  • Gregory Keating

    Los Angeles Daily News

    January 31, 2016

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was mentioned in a story about an upcoming legal town hall event he will appear at to speak with those affected by the Porter Ranch gas leak about their legal rights and damages they could be owed. He said local residents have strong nuisance claims against the Southern California Gas Company and possibly claims of negligence as well. “It’s speculative whether or not home prices will crash and crash forever, or if this will blow over and return to normal for that area,” Keating said. “Whenever something is speculative, it’s much more difficult to prove as a matter of damages.”

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 29, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about Donald Trump and the sentiment of some Americans who have grown tired of the political establishment. "Debates matter. They can be noisy and contentious, but it's the music of freedom you're hearing," Estrich wrote. "If the Donald won't play, if he claims to be above the rituals that define politics for a free people, then he is the answer to nothing and the biggest phony of them all."

  • Gregory Keating

    KPCC-FM

    January 26, 2016

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed on "AirTalk" about claims that San Bernardino County fostered a hostile work environment that led to the terror attacks in December 2015. "It’s a stretch in my opinion," said Keating. "Normally what you would bring is a lawsuit based on tort law where you would say that the county has a duty to protect its workers from such attacks and there is a duty like that. It’s a stretch in my opinion. While you can give a plausible chain like that. It’s difficult to say that it’s really a compelling case."

  • Camille Gear Rich

    U.S. News and World Report

    January 26, 2016

    Re: Camille Gear Rich

    The First Generation Professionals Program headed by Gould School of Law professor Camille Gear Rich was featured in a story. The program is designed to help first-generation students succeed in law school. The program was conceived in the fall of last year and since then has become home to 37 students from a variety of backgrounds, both ethnically and socially. "It's a way of establishing community," Gear Rich said. "It's about understanding and appreciating where you come from."

  • Michael Chasalow

    Wired

    January 25, 2016

    Re: Michael Chasalow

    Michael Chasalow was quoted about the potential for ExxonMobil to face legal repercussions if they are found to have lied to investors. “There are some weaknesses in the securities law, and there’s also uncertainty on the side of ExxonMobil,” says Chasalow. “That’s why I think it would ultimately be settled out of court.”

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 22, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about perceived turmoil within the Hillary Clinton campaign after Bernie Sanders closed the gap with Clinton in several polls. "Bernie Sanders isn't gaining on Clinton because she hasn't put up enough smarmy ads trying to turn a man who is a decent and principled senator into — what? You want to talk about a tactic that's likely to backfire, try that," Estrich wrote. "But I'm sure there are people within the Clinton campaign suggesting it. For my money, this is not about Bernie, and it's not about Clinton's aides. It's about Clinton herself."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Reuters

    January 22, 2016

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Reuters wrote an article that featured research by Alexander Kappner of the USC Gould School of Law. The research explains how 66 lawyers in private practice, most working for business are able to dominate the United States Supreme Court's docket.

  • Heidi Rummel

    San Francisco Chronicle

    January 20, 2016

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel and the Post-Conviction Justice Project were mentioned in a story about a recent state appellate court ruling in favor of a PCJP client that will require a judge to consider an inmate's good deeds in prison when deciding whether they should be eligible for parole. Rummel said the appellate court recognized that juveniles shouldn't have to wait 15 years before asking for the hope of future parole.

  • Gregory Keating

    The Los Angeles Times

    January 19, 2016

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was quoted about the various lawsuits currently being filed in relation to the Porter Ranch gas leaks. "When it comes to the race for plaintiffs, well, plaintiffs' lawyers like to be paid," Keating said. "They also like to make more money, not less, so the more good, competent plaintiffs with good stories to tell the better."

  • Jody David Armour

    The Los Angeles Review of Books

    January 19, 2016

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour wrote an op-ed about symbols of racial division in America. Writing about the controversy over the Confederate flag and the historic uses of the "N" word, Armour explained how the national sense of "us" and "them" has changed over the country's history. "Confederate battle flag critics use the symbol to isolate a 'them' of segregationists and white supremacists and to mobilize a racially liberal and inclusive 'us.' Many battle flag supporters use the same symbol to distinguish an 'us' of folk with Southern pride from a 'them' of folk without," Armour wrote.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Al Jazeera

    January 17, 2016

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about a recent Oxfam report that claims that offshore tax havens for corporations and the wealthy are contributing to economic inequality. Kleinbard said "substantial progress has been made in the last few years." Corporations "are very aggressive in their interpretation of law, and they negotiate sweetheart deals with countries, and transparency will help with all of that,” he added.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Wall Street Journal

    January 15, 2016

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about a tax measure proposed by some high-ranking U.S. senators that would impose retaliatory double taxes on European Union countries in response to EU investigations into special tax deals between European countries and U.S.-based companies. Kleinbard said the senators were “pandering to their donors by trying to argue that any tax on a U.S. multinational is an attack on the United States.” “All audits are necessarily retroactive, and the sweetheart deals that U.S. firms reached with some EU countries were always subject to the higher authority of EU law, as applied here to some egregious facts," Kleinbard added.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 15, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about recent news that presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz failed to report two loans he received for his 2012 Senate campaign. "Of course, there's nothing wrong with getting a loan to finance your campaign," Estrich wrote. "...But Goldman is the symbol of Wall Street excess, and Ted Cruz getting the rich guys' rate is not exactly the image he's trying to portray with Iowa only weeks away. Which brings me back to my point. Everything is going to come out. So if Cruz had told us himself, six months ago, when no one was paying attention, it would be old news, not a front-page story. Oh, the fun is just beginning — for the press, anyway."

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    Financial Times

    January 14, 2016

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen co-authored an op-ed about Puerto Rico's options as a territory of the United States for restructuring its debt. "The Puerto Rico legislature could clarify that — in the context of a multicreditor debt issued by an entity that is not entitled to restructure its debts under the auspices of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code — the implicit duty of good faith in Puerto Rico law-governed contracts encompasses an obligation to cooperate with fellow lenders in that debt’s restructuring. That is, if future circumstances render normal performance impractical," Rasmussen wrote.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 13, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about Hillary Clinton's disappearing lead in the polls in Iowa and New Hampshire. "There are two ways to win a nomination. One, the way you always dream of, is winning Iowa and New Hampshire and everyone else effectively is dead. That is what the Clinton campaign actually thought they could do last time," Estrich wrote. "The other, the one I have to believe the Clinton campaign is prepared for, is by grinding it out. You win the states no one else can afford to really contest. You score big among minority voters (not many in Iowa and New Hampshire), push your numbers among women and call in decades of chits (and good judgment) to win the support of all those super delegates who count in a grind."

  • Edward McCaffery

    CNN.com

    January 12, 2016

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery wrote an op-ed about why a proposal by Hillary Clinton to raise tax rates on those earning over $5 million a year would do little to fix a U.S. tax system that benefits the rich. "Politicians like Clinton or FDR may make a big splash by attempting to raise tax rates on these high wage-earners, and the advisers will come running to the rich to help them plan around the increased taxes," McCaffery wrote. "All the while the 800-pound gorilla -- the fact that the U.S. tax system is highly ineffective at getting at capital or wealth other than wages -- keeps getting ignored."

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Downtown News

    January 11, 2016

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about a spike in reported crimes in downtown Los Angeles. “You can’t be sure until you see a major trend line. You have outliers and anomalies. Crime in L.A. has been on a downward trend in the big picture,” Armour said. “There is a big difference between individual years and groups of years, over five or 10 years, when it comes to understanding correlation and causation.”

  • Jody David Armour

    The Los Angeles Times

    January 9, 2016

    Re: Jody David Armour

    The Los Angeles Times reported that Jody Armour will discuss race and rap lyrics at an event to be held at the Ronald Tutor Campus Center later this month. The event is part of a larger series of events to be held January 22-24 titled "Freedom of Expression in a Changing World: What Cannot Be Said" which coincides with the anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo attacks. "The idea that there are certain things that cannot be said is part of what this conference is about and also part of what led to those killings," said Amy Wilentz, co-founder and chairwoman of the Forum for the Academy and the Public.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 8, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about the growing spotlight on the campaign of Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz. "Cruz may or may not be the most popular Republican in Iowa, but unless all the pollsters and talkers are wrong (which, admittedly, does happen), he should win," Estrich wrote. "And winning Iowa gets you the spotlight, particularly when the story on the other side is the predictable victory of the frontrunner."

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 6, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about saying yes to new experiences in the new year. "I was reading an interview with the world's most successful television producer, Shonda Rhimes, about how she juggles life as a single mother of three while working insane hours producing some of the best shows on television. Rhimes is refreshingly honest about the fact that work-family balance is a lot easier to attain when you have unlimited funds," Estrich wrote. "She's also honest about the fact that for all her success, something was missing. Isn't it always? In this case, and in her now best-selling book, she describes a year of saying yes to things she would otherwise shy away from, be afraid of and say no to."

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    January 1, 2016

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about Bill Clinton's role in Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. "Of course the former president is going to campaign on behalf of his wife," Estrich wrote. "I have yet to meet a Democrat running for any office in recent years whose first choice for a 'surrogate' to raise money or to campaign wasn’t Bill Clinton. So he’ll be out there, as he should be, as wives have been doing for decades, helping his spouse get elected."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Los Angeles Times

    December 30, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez featured Edward Kleinbard and his book "We Are Better Than This." In the column on income inequality, Lopez quoted Kleinbard: "We are the richest economy in the world, but an extraordinary number of Americans live in poverty. We are the most unequal society of all large peer economies, and even more shocking, we are nowhere near the top in income mobility — the ability to climb from poor to rich or to slide down the opposite side of that hill." Lopez also mentioned that Kleinbard was on a panel with him at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at USC.

  • Emily Ryo

    KPCC-FM

    December 30, 2015

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed in-studio on "Take Two" about the challenges facing America's overwhelmed immigration courts. "There's been an enormous backlog of immigration cases that has been clogging up the system. Immigration judges handle 1,400 to 1,500 cases per year on average, with only about one law clerk spread out across four immigration judges," Ryo said. "The immigration issue will really play an important and prominent role in the upcoming election year," she added.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Daily Journal

    December 30, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Stanley Gold '67, CEO of Shamrock's Holdings and Shamrock Capital Advisors, along with his wife, Ilene, have pledged $2.5 million to the USC Gould School of Law for a new scholarship program that aims to attract the top students in the country. The donation will allow for the creation of the Honor Scholars Program, which will provide merit-based scholarships as well as three years of special academic and professional programming for participating students. The Stanley and Ilene Gold Scholars will be invited to two workshops each year focusing on a scholarly project or important legal issues while having access to networking events with prominent alumni among other benefits. "Scholarships are critical to the success of high-achieving students who may come from modest beginnings, just as I did," Gold said.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Huffington Post

    December 29, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was cited from his book "We Are Better Than This" in a blog post about public versus private financing in health care. Kleinbard wrote that because the federal government spends about $1 trillion per year on the health of Americans, it subsidizes virtually everyone with health insurance of any kind, including those who believe they have entirely private employer-sponsored health insurance.

  • Alexander Capron

    The Washington Post

    December 29, 2015

    Re: Alexander Capron

    Alexander Capron co-authored an op-ed arguing that while reimbursing organ donors for the costs of donating is permissible, a proposal to combat a donor shortage by lifting the U.S. ban on paying for organs would be both morally wrong and ineffective. "In country after country, the same phenomenon occurs: Financial incentives 'crowd out' voluntary donation," Capron wrote. "Kidney patients have no reason to turn to relatives and, more important, governments have no need to develop the infrastructure and public support for deceased donation when organs can be obtained from poor strangers."

  • Andrew T. Guzman

    Daily Journal

    December 29, 2015

    Re: Andrew T. Guzman

    Andrew Guzman was featured in a story about law school deans finding support for innovation. Guzman has been in office since the summer; however, that has not stopped him from creating and pushing for innovative programs at the USC Gould School of Law. Programs include a global network for law schools to be a part of and collaborate on. In addition, Guzman hopes to create a master's degree program that will allow non-lawyers to learn legal tools useful in business. According to Guzman, University leaders have been highly supportive of such ideas. "If we at the law school want to do something creative or innovative, the first instinct is not to shut it down," he said. "It is just the opposite." Despite the many challenges that face legal education, deans of law schools have an ever increasing opportunity to pursue new programs as well as wide-scale reform.

  • Niels W. Frenzen

    KPCC-FM

    December 28, 2015

    Re: Niels W. Frenzen

    Niels Frenzen was interviewed on "AirTalk" about a rise in deportations of Central American youth. "We've seen the Obama administration - and we can talk about whether or not this is good policy - take a very hard line in regard to both the unaccompanied children who are coming from Central America as well as the so-called 'family units' who are coming," Frenzen said. "The administration has chosen to have a very harsh detention and deportation policy and we are seeing, if the Washington Post reports are correct, another aspect of this harsh deterrence policy about to take effect."

  • Camille Gear Rich

    The Los Angeles Times

    December 27, 2015

    Re: Camille Gear Rich

    USC Gould School's new program to help first-generation law students succeed was featured. The First Gen Program is similar to initiatives at Yale and Columbia University. "Law school is a mysterious place to people who have never been there. Our goal isn't to tell them how to study for this exam better," said USC Gould School Dean Andrew Guzman. "It's to make it clear they belong." About 40 students participated in this semester's program, said Camille Gear Rich, director of the program. The First Gen Program holds talks that encourage law students to have a "healthy sense of entitlement" and pushes them to interact with professors.

  • Andrew T. Guzman

    The Los Angeles Times

    December 26, 2015

    Re: Andrew T. Guzman

    Andrew Guzman was quoted about USC Gould's efforts to help first-generation college students succeed with a program similar to initiatives at Yale and Columbia University. "Law school is a mysterious place to people who have never been there. Our goal isn't to tell them how to study for this exam better," Guzman said. "It's to make it clear they belong." About 40 students participated in this semester's program.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 25, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about the need to be more tolerant. "A real leader starts a parade; he doesn't look for one and position himself in front," Estrich wrote. "This is a time when we need every presidential candidate to appeal to the better angels of our nature, to remind us that we are a nation of immigrants, that the sins of the few should not be visited on the many, and that we should lend a hand to the stranger in need. Isn't that what Christmas is about?"

  • Heidi Rummel

    Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Switzerland)

    December 18, 2015

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel and the Post-Conviction Justice Project were featured in a story about juvenile offenders tried as adults and convicted to life sentences. The story described the successful re-sentencing of PCJP client Ellis Curtis.

  • Valerie Barreiro

    San Francisco Chronicle

    December 18, 2015

    Re: Valerie Barreiro

    Valerie Barreiro commented on a new study on self-harming images on Instagram. Barreiro said that social media companies have huge batches of content moving through their networks daily, and leaving it to users to report what bothers them helps companies manage the load. The firms also have to think about whether they want to be seen as subjectively deciding what is art versus something that might be offensive. “There’s a fine line between undue involvement and appropriately enforcing their guidelines,” Barreiro said.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 18, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about issues facing the campaign of Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio. "It's just not clear where he is going to win, at least among the four early states: Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada," Estrich wrote. "It's unlikely that anyone will sweep all four, but if you don't win one of them, how do you claim to be in the top tier?"

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 16, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about the decision by L.A. Unified School District to close all of its schools in response to a threat that turned out to not be credible. "I accept that L.A. was wrong as it turned out. Whether it was wrong to close the schools according to its own standards, we don't know," Estrich wrote. "But I'd still rather be safe than sorry. I know fear exacts a cost. But I, for one, will be less fearful if I can trust my government to take fewer chances rather than more of them."

  • Jody David Armour

    The Wrap

    December 16, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about sexual assault cases filed against adult-film star James Deen and potential legal action against related studios. “If I were a tort attorney, one of the parties that I would be seriously considering bringing an action against would be the studio itself, on negligence grounds and perhaps some other grounds,” Armour said. “I would say, ‘Did you know that James Deen had other complaints against him? If you had any way of knowing that he had these complaints against him, then you knew he posed a heightened risk, that he was a danger to other workers,'” Armour explained.

  • Scott Altman

    MSNBC

    December 14, 2015

    Re: Scott Altman

    Scott Altman was quoted about the potential legal challenges involved in deciding custody of the San Bernardino shooters' six-month-old baby. Had her parents died in an accident, the outcome would be simple. “The basic outline of a case in which both parents of a baby die is not a rare event. When that happens and family members are willing to take custody, family members get custody,” Altman said. But first, a judge and social workers must assess whether that relative is suitable, and that could be messy in this case. “Everyone must feel terribly sorry for this child, who will not only grow up without parents, but will grow up to learn what her parents did,” Altman added.

  • Heidi Rummel

    Associated Press

    December 11, 2015

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel was quoted about a clemency case in Alaska in which the state offered to free three men convicted in the 1997 death of a Fairbanks teenager. In exchange, the men would not be allowed to sue government entities and would have to withdraw their claims of innocence. Rummel called the proposed deal highly unusual and said it would be much more typical for judges to vacate original convictions in exchange for pleas to lesser charges. "Honestly, it's like the state is trying to have its cake and eat it, too," Rummel said.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 11, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about gun control proposals. "A majority of Americans favor reasonable restrictions on who can buy guns. Will such restrictions mean that criminals will no longer be able to secure guns? No," Estrich wrote. "But the next question never gets asked: Will such restrictions mean law-abiding citizens can't secure guns? No. So why shouldn't we at least make it more difficult for terrorists to arm themselves, and more risky for them to buy guns?"

  • Edwin Smith

    The Los Angeles Times

    December 10, 2015

    Re: Edwin Smith

    Edwin Smith was quoted about recent comments made by presidential candidate Donald Trump on Muslims and immigration. “Clearly, it’s not how democracy works," Smith said of Trump's plan to bar Muslims from entering the country. Smith also noted that such acts require Congress to create laws banning Muslims or other immigrants. Such a law would face "tremendous legal troubles if passed," said Smith.

  • Edwin Smith

    CBS News KCBS-TV

    December 10, 2015

    Re: Edwin Smith

    Edwin Smith was interviewed about Donald Trump's recent comments regarding immigration and Muslims. Smith said that without an act from Congress, a president might be able unilaterally ban all Muslims from entering the country should he argue that the country is at war and an exclusion of a particular religion would protect the American people. “He could make that argument,” said Smith. "That is exactly the argument that Franklin Roosevelt brought in imprisoning the Japanese."

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Wave

    December 10, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about a group calling for Los Angeles D.A. Jackie Lacey to step down after declining to charge a police officer who was caught on camera beating a woman on the shoulder of the 10 Freeway last year. “Lacey’s decision not to prosecute a flagrant case of excessive force is an outrage and proves that having a black face in the D.A.’s office does not ensure more even-handed justice in matters of police brutality,” said Armour. “Jackie Lacey cares more about maintaining a good working relationship with police (and securing the political endorsement of their union) than protecting the public from cruel and corrupt officers.”

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 9, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about what she called demagoguery on the part of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. "Barring Muslims from entry is his logical next step if his goal is to exploit peoples' feelings of anger, fear and helplessness," Estrich wrote. "He is someone who can get attention to light the match. Trump is a professional manipulator of public opinion; he has spent his life pushing the line of outrageousness and getting rewarded for it."

  • Heidi Rummel

    The Daily Journal

    December 7, 2015

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel wrote an op-ed about the importance of DNA and video recordings for preventing wrongful convictions and holding law enforcement officials accountable in use-of-force cases. "These incidents demonstrate that we cannot blindly trust in the word of all law enforcement officers, especially in situations where the officers have strong incentives to lie," Rummel wrote. "In use of force cases, officers may lie to cover up their own misdeeds, avoid employment discipline, or criminal prosecution."

  • Jody David Armour

    USA Today

    December 7, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on camera about the impact of mass shootings on gun control discussions. "It’s hard to imagine that this steady parade and procession of victims from mass shootings and other kinds of gun violence can’t eventually have an impact on the national psyche and have it drum up the political will to get its leaders and lawmakers to pass legislation that will address the problem," Armour said.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Los Angeles Times

    December 4, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about corporate tax avoidance. "The right solution is worldwide tax consolidation at a fair rate," Kleibard said, which would prevent corporations from playing one country's tax regime off against another's. The reform could reduce the U.S. corporate tax rate, Kleinbard said, but it would result in cleaner, fairer and more productive taxes.

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 4, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about the negative opinions of Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz by many members of his own political party. "Because if you believe his old 'friends' and his colleagues and the reporters who cover him, Ted Cruz is not just your run-of-the-mill arrogant and self-centered politician. According to them, he is in a class by himself," Estrich wrote. "...As Politico recently reported, Cruz's rise is driving desperate Republicans, especially senators, into the camp of Marco Rubio, who shares many of the same views as Cruz, but is, quite simply, not hated by his co-workers."

  • Susan Estrich

    Creators Syndicate

    December 2, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column revisiting the capture and murder of eleven Israeli Olympic team members in 1972. "In Israel, such things happen with a frequency that we would find intolerable," Estrich wrote. "Every family has lost someone, or has a relative or friend who has lost a child or a brother."

  • Scott Altman

    Daily Journal

    November 30, 2015

    Re: Scott Altman

    Scott Altman was quoted about the State Bar's push to require students to complete more practical skills classes while also reducing the performance test portion of the bar exam, a move that some law school officials said sent mixed messages. Altman, however, said the State Bar concluded that there is a limit to how effectively practical skills can be tested. "The important part was ensuring all students are trained in practice skills and less that they could discern those skills on the written exam," he said.

  • Jody David Armour

    The Los Angeles Times

    November 27, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about the legal history of director Roman Polanski. “Polanski plied a 13-year-old with alcohol and drugs and faced statutory rape, not rape like he would if one college student had done the crime to another,” said Armour.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Los Angeles Times

    November 25, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    USC Gould was mentioned in a story about the nearly 7 percent rise in the number of graduates from nationally accredited law schools.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Washington Post

    November 23, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about a merger between Pfizer and Allergan that has created one of the world's largest drugmakers. The deal reignited a debate over corporate tax inversion strategies that experts say have diverted billions in tax revenue from U.S. coffers. "Treasury is trying to hold back the tide with a broom, but that is an unfair position into which to put Treasury. The U.S. Congress owns the tax code," Kleinbard said. "What is going on here is a dereliction of duty by Congress, and Treasury is doing the best it can in an impossible situation."

  • Edwin Smith

    BBC

    November 19, 2015

    Re: Edwin Smith

    Edwin Smith was interviewed about the terror attacks in Paris.

  • Andrew T. Guzman

    Azteca America

    November 18, 2015

    Re: Andrew T. Guzman

    Andrew Guzman's installation as the first Latino dean of USC Gould was featured. Guzman told attendees that his father came from the Dominican Republic and immigrated at the age of 13, forcing him to learn a new language and culture. "These are some of the challenges that confront many Latinos," Guzman said. Frank Cruz of Telemundo Los Angeles affiliate KVEA-TV called it a historic event.

  • Edwin Smith

    San Gabriel Valley Tribune

    November 17, 2015

    Re: Edwin Smith

    Edwin Smith was quoted about the impact of the Paris terrorist attacks on U.S. air security. “I have some friends who are in the process of traveling back to the East Coast right now," Smith said. "I’ve texted them and they’re saying the delays are substantial. There is visible protection in major cities and an awareness among travelers about things that have happened. I’m sure there will be a level of security in place that we haven’t seen before.”

  • Edwin Smith

    CW News (KTLA-TV)

    November 17, 2015

    Re: Edwin Smith

    Edwin Smith was interviewed about the recent terror attacks in Paris. "The Schengen Agreement, which is the treaty by which all the European states allow people to move from one state to another, creates a frightening situation, especially when you have a large number of European citizens with passports who have gone to fight with ISIS -- many of whom have come back," Smith said.

  • Camille Gear Rich

    The Los Angeles Times

    November 16, 2015

    Re: Camille Gear Rich

    Camille Gear Rich was highlighted in an article about USC's new steps to encourage diversity and understanding. Rich, along with two other faculty members, will lead the provost's office's oversight and coordination of campus-wide diversity and inclusion efforts.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Reuters

    November 16, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Pfizer's use of corporate tax inversions. He said the company's arrangements reflected "agressive tax planning." "This is a company that is investing heavily in tax research, as well as pharmaceutical research," he joked.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Los Angeles Times

    November 16, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Pfizer's corporate tax inversions. Kleinbard suggested a two-year moratorium on all inversions "to reduce the hemorrhaging" should Congress and the White House finally make a permanent deal on corporate taxes. He argued that elements of a new corporate tax structure are clear on both sides of the partisan aisle. "The scope of disagreement between [House Speaker Paul] Ryan and President Obama is so small that they could work out the bullet points in the course of a weekend," he said.

  • Andrew T. Guzman

    Univision

    November 16, 2015

    Re: Andrew T. Guzman

    Andrew Guzman was featured as the first Latino dean of the Gould School of Law. "I find it strange that it has been this long since a Hispanic has been elected, but I celebrate this even if it is late that I am the first in charge," Guzman said. When speaking about first-generation college students, Guzman said, "Less privileged students are not accustomed to interacting with veteran lawyers, something we aspire to become, and this program hopes to help students feel comfortable in such an environment."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Washington Post

    November 16, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    The Washington Post quoted Edward Kleinbard about Bernie Sanders' tax proposals and cited a letter signed by him and other tax law experts about corporate profits being at an all-time high while U.S. taxes are at an all-time low. Kleinbard said closing the corporate tax loophole on foreign earnings could generate enough revenue to cover Sanders' ambitious infrastructure spending plan. “You might well conclude that it would be perfectly plausible to imagine picking up $500 to $600 billion in actual revenue in the first 5 years alone, so easily over $1 trillion over 10 — not counting the backward looking tax on existing earnings,” Kleinbard said.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The New York Times

    November 14, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Pfizer's use of corporate tax inversions after the announcement of a deal that could move the company's legal tax headquarters from New York to Dublin. “I’m hoping that Congress imposes a two-year timeout on tax inversions,” he said. “If Congress doesn’t act, tax inversions will be very appealing for many American corporations."

  • Michael Brennan

    Los Angeles Daily News

    November 13, 2015

    Re: Michael Brennan

    Michael Brennan was quoted about the impact of Proposition 47, which reclassified six low-level drug and property offenses from felonies to misdemeanors, one year after being enacted. “Some police departments, if they determine these misdemeanors are not going to be handled as seriously ... could determine they won’t make as many arrests and bookings for relatively minor criminal infractions," said Brennan.

  • Valerie Barreiro

    CNBC

    November 13, 2015

    Re: Valerie Barreiro

    Valerie Barreiro was interviewed about In-N-Out's legal dispute with restaurant delivery service DoorDash for trademark infringement. "Consumers will probably believe that In-N-Out has some involvement and control over the temperature or the timing of when the food is delivered and that the experience of the consumer when they get the food will be similar to that if In-N-Out were involved, when in fact it’s not," Barreiro said.

  • Jody David Armour

    KPCC-FM

    November 12, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "AirTalk" about the Supreme Court decisions related to excessive force by police officers. "They have to apply the 'reasonable person' test and ask if a reasonable person in the shoes of the officer would have made or could have made the same decision and reached the same conclusions," Armour said. "It is really a big step forward in a lot of ways."

  • Valerie Barreiro

    CBS Los Angeles KCBS-TV

    November 9, 2015

    Re: Valerie Barreiro

    Valerie Barreiro was quoted about a recent "sexting" scandal involving teenagers at a Colorado high school. She noted that there is no law in the country that allows victims to have what's been posted pulled off the Internet. “That’s certainly a concern,” Barreiro said. “Letting individuals know that they might not be able to control the dissemination of information so they need to be the first safeguard.”

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Wall Street Journal

    November 8, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Pfizer's international tax strategies, which appear to raise its effective tax rate. Very few companies report foreign earning the way Pfizer does, in part because it lowers their reported earnings. "Even if the accountants beat Pfizer up, which I say with a wink, it remains the case that it’s still an entirely artificial charge in that it will never ripen into an actual cash tax bill until Pfizer actually moves the cash," Kleinbard said.

  • Daniel Klerman

    Reuters

    November 6, 2015

    Re: Daniel Klerman

    Dan Klerman was quoted about patent lawsuits involving Kraft Foods and the plaintiff-friendly courts of Texas. The swelling tide of patent lawsuits in the Eastern District of Texas is due to forum shopping and "forum selling," Klerman said.

  • Michael Brennan

    KCRW

    November 6, 2015

    Re: Michael Brennan

    Michael Brennan was interviewed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand about the effects of Proposition 47, which reduced some drug and property crimes from felonies to misdemeanors when it was passed one year ago. Detractors of the measure link it to a spike in homelessness and crime. "I haven't been aware of anything connecting the two," Brennan said. "Most of the people committing felony and/or misdemeanor offenses are not homeless. While some of the inmates who are released from prison might become homeless, I don't think a substantial percentage would or have."

  • Susan Estrich

    Odessa American

    November 5, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column about the concept of aging gracefully. "Of course, the hardest part of aging is not the wrinkles or even the aches and pains, but the sadness that comes with losing parents and friends, the melancholy of seeing your children leave home and go off on their own," Estrich wrote.

  • John Matsusaka

    Monterey Herald

    November 3, 2015

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka was quoted about a new ballot initiative introduced by plastic bag makers in their battle to repeal the state ban on single-use plastic bags, which is up for voter approval in a November 2016 referendum. The new initiative would require grocers to deposit fees collected for paper and thicker plastic bags into an account for environmental improvement projects, but Matsusaka said it could be a confusion tactic by the bag makers. “Voters faced with too many choices get confused, and confused voters tend to vote no on everything,” he said. “In this case, that’s exactly what the proponents of the referendum want.”

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Indiewire

    November 2, 2015

    Re: Mark Litwak

    Mark Litwak wrote a column about how new crowdfunding rules will change the landscape of how indie films are financed. "Essentially the new rules will allow companies like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to offer those who contribute funds to receive more than posters, T-shirts and the other swag they now get in return for a donation," Litwak wrote. "For the first time, promoters will also be able to offer a share of the profits in a project."

  • Susan Estrich

    Noozhawk

    October 29, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote a column on how presidential candidate hopeful Hilary Clinton plays the gender card to her advantage. "As she has done repeatedly over the last two weeks, Hillary Clinton showed what a formidable candidate she is," said Estrich.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Los Angeles Times

    October 29, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about the tax incentives of Pfizer buying Ireland-based Allergan. "Lots of people have assumed this will be an inversion transaction, but neither party has confirmed," Kleinbard said.

  • Jody David Armour

    KPCC-FM

    October 28, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "AirTalk" about the Black Lives Matter movement after protesters interrupted a community meeting hosted by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti in South L.A. "They went to some tactics that Black Lives Matter is known for. They've been, from early on, about disruption, inconvenience -- 'Shut it down' -- and uncomfortable conversations," Armour said. "It has worked spectacularly well for them from a polling standpoint when you look at the numbers of Americans who pay attention to race and racism now."

  • Josh Lockman

    CNN

    October 23, 2015

    Re: Josh Lockman

    Josh Lockman was interviewed about the 11-hour congressional hearing into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's response to the Benghazi attacks. "She absolutely held her own. It was an exceptional performance under a marathon session," Lockman said. "We had Republican congressmembers that were, in their tone and tenor, almost delivering a criminal prosecution in their line of questioning. It was so vitriolic and acrimonious that I think Republicans will rue the the day that they decided to proceed in this manner with this investigation."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Fortune

    October 22, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Uber's tax strategies. Kleinbard said that the strategies the company employs in creating a network of foreign subsidiaries to minimize taxes are legal and similar to those used by bigger tech names such as Apple, Google and Facebook. "Silicon Valley is a small place," Kleinbard said. "Just as there is a vibrant atmosphere for tech innovation, there is a vibrant climate for sharing tax innovation."

  • Susan Estrich

    Athens Banner-Herald

    October 21, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote an op-ed arguing that Donald Trump has hit his ceiling with voters. "Trump is never going to win among women, or moderates, or minorities, or lots of other people who could cost him a general election or even a head-to-head primary. But when you’re talking about contests in which 27 percent makes you the frontrunner, and white males are predominating, yes, Trump can win Iowa," Estrich wrote. "And yes, I guess it’s true that if the race doesn’t get narrowed down soon enough, and if all the conventional candidates fall flat, it is even theoretically possible than Donald Trump could be the Republican nominee. But he will never win the presidency."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The Huffington Post

    October 21, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard wrote an op-ed about a federal debt ceiling crisis that could be triggered in early November if what he called a "rudderless, riven and ineffective Congress" does not take action. "If triggered, a debt ceiling crisis would be a constitutional and fiscal nightmare of the first order," Kleinbard wrote. "From the time of Alexander Hamilton to today, this country has never dishonored its debts and other financial obligations, but that is exactly what a debt ceiling crisis would entail."

  • Gregory Keating

    Associated Press

    October 19, 2015

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was quoted about how lawsuits brought against Volkswagen in the wake of its emissions scandal could force the company to buy back cars equipped with the test-rigging software. The plaintiffs make the case that the cars can't be driven legally since they violate pollution standards, Keating said. Even though the EPA says the cars can legally stay on the roads, eventually states with pollution tests will force owners to comply with the law, he added. "They can't give me the car that they told me I was buying, and they're forcing me to inflict environmental harm and be out of compliance with California law because of the wrong they committed," plaintiffs can argue, said Keating.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    KPFK-FM

    October 19, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was interviewed on "Background Briefing with Ian Masters" about an impending debt ceiling crisis for the United States. "We have never in the 226-year history of the Republic, have never had an occasion on which the government of the United States has stood up and systematically dishonored its financial obligations," Kleinbard said. "That's what a debt ceiling crisis is saying, it's saying we will not pay our financial obligations, and that includes all forms of financial obligations, not just Tresury bonds, not just Social Security payments, but everything from rent to a landlord who's leasing property to the U.S. government, to military salaries for our men and women in service and salaries for every federal employee -- every financial disbursement by the government of the United States would in a sense now be called into question because the Treasury Department would not have the resources -- would not be permitted by Congress -- to borrow the funds necessary to pay those bills."

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Review of Books

    October 11, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about his recent work, including a journal article, blog and documentary film. Armour discussed the use of the "n-word" in history and culture and what it says about the way we think about race. "The n-word demands that the speaker have a certain social identity," Armour said. "And so now the question becomes: can you as a member of that group, the group that’s been the butt of that word for 350 years, can you reappropriate it, invert it, and use it in your own way, either in an oppositional way or as a term of endearment?"

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Chronicle of Higher Education

    October 11, 2015

    Re: Elyn Saks

    A story about our understanding of mental illness mentioned "The Center Cannot Hold" by Elyn Saks as a "riveting" and "gorgeous" memoir about living with schizophrenia.

  • Jody David Armour

    The Wrap

    October 9, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about questions that Bill Cosby will likely face in his deposition for a sexual assault case. “Some initial questions are, ‘Were you aware that this particular female was underage?’ ‘How could you not know that a 15-year-old was a minor?’ ‘Fifteen-year-olds don’t necessarily look like 18 or 19-year-olds, do they?’ Getting into the whole question of how reasonable or unreasonable or even reckless he was in concluding that this 15-year-old was of an age that he could have non-criminal sexual contact with her,” Armour said. “It’s going to be on his attorneys to object on relevancy grounds, and then the judge is going to have to look at these objections and determine whether the witness is being cooperative or unnecessarily obstructionist."

  • Camille Gear Rich

    The Los Angeles Times

    October 8, 2015

    Re: Camille Gear Rich

    Camille Rich was cited about the California Fair Wage Act and its potential impact on the state's business climate. Rich said while the law has been lauded as a strong step toward closing the wage gap between men and women, it could actually discourage employers from moving to California.

  • Josh Lockman

    CNN

    October 8, 2015

    Re: Josh Lockman

    Josh Lockman was interviewed about spreading unrest in the Middle East. "Some have called it an intifada of individual initiatives, not necessarily directed by the Palestinian leadership per se, but the types of lone-wolf attacks that we've seen take place over the last couple of weeks," Lockman said. "Prime Minister Netanyahu is doing everything he can to try to avoid that from playing out, along with Mahmoud Abbas. I think neither leader wants to see an escalation, it does not serve them well by any means."

  • Jody David Armour

    KCRW

    October 8, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "Which Way, L.A.?" about an LAPD shooting of a man in Van Nuys after their cruiser's rear window was shattered. "When cops are constantly told that they're under constant fire, that every interaction with a citizen could be their last, or that they're fortunate each time they come home from a job in one piece, it's poison for police-community relationships," Armour said. "It puts police in a combative mindset, it isolates them from the community and it generates these kinds of risks."

  • Jody David Armour

    CBS Los Angeles KCBS-TV

    October 8, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about UCLA students reported to have worn blackface during a party. Armour said a lot of discrimination isn't intentional but is harmful just the same. “I think there’s little doubt a lot of young folks aren’t aware of the history of the blackface and minstrelism and they need to be educated. These are teachable moments,” Armour said.

  • Lisa Klerman

    KPCC-FM

    October 7, 2015

    Re: Lisa Klerman

    Lisa Klerman was interviewed on "Take Two" about the California Fair Pay Act. "The new law really strengthens the state's existing equal pay laws," Klerman said. "It eliminates some of the loopholes that were preventing effective enforcement under the old regime in place, like the same establishment provision, for example, where a woman who worked at a facility in Pomona could not compare her pay to that of a man who worked in Compton or Torrance, even if they worked for the same company."

  • Jody David Armour

    Intersections South L.A.

    October 7, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about the importance of video in keeping instances of police brutality in the news. He pointed to the Rodney King beating in 1991 as an early example. "It was the first time you had a video tape spark this kind of prosecution," Armour said. "Now we take it for granted."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Fusion

    October 7, 2015

    Re: Joseph Latham

    Joseph Latham was quoted about the impact of the California Fair Pay Act. Critics of the law allege that it will mean more lawsuits that hurt businesses overall. "It is going to lead to lots more litigation, which further weakens the business climate in California," Latham said.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Los Angeles Times

    October 6, 2015

    Re: Joseph Latham

    Joseph Latham was quoted about the impact of the California Fair Pay Act. Latham said that the new law will mean more employees taking more bosses to court. "It is going to lead to lots more litigation, which further weakens the business climate in California," he said.

  • Michael Chasalow

    The Globe and Mail

    October 6, 2015

    Re: Michael Chasalow

    Michael Chasalow was quoted about Toronto startup Flixel, which raised a $2.2 million seed funding round with the help of an eight-minute documentary-style video about their company story. He said if the video helped Flixel's case with investors, it may have been because they're making a visual product and the video acts as "a way to humanize the people involved." "I don't know that I would say 'everybody should make a YouTube video and that’s a way to get money," Chasalow said. "There's a lot of noise out there and I'd say that sometimes the conventional path is not the best way to get noticed by investors, but if I’m getting sent 10 or 15 videos, am I going to watch them all?"

  • Edwin Smith

    The Los Angeles Times

    October 4, 2015

    Re: Edwin Smith

    Edwin Smith was cited about cases in which a home country may waive diplomatic immunity. Smith referenced a 1997 incident in which a Georgian diplomat killed a Maryland teenager in a car crash in Washington, D.C.. Smith said Georgia agreed to waive the man's immunity in order to preserve its good relations with the U.S., just years after the fall of the Soviet Union. The man was tried and sentenced to seven to 21 years in prison.

  • Josh Lockman

    CNN

    October 4, 2015

    Re: Josh Lockman

    Josh Lockman was interviewed about relations between the United States and Cuba. "It could be a stall; it also could just be a slow and steady climb," Lockman said. "In the wake of the rapprochement that has taken place and the seminal moment with the reopening of embassies, talks aren't proceeding as fast as people thought they were. That being said, progress has been made on trade issues and civil aviation agreements are underway. But there are many issues that President Obama and the White House simply cannot touch because of the U.S. embargo under Congressional control."

  • Gregory Keating

    The Los Angeles Times

    October 3, 2015

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was quoted about the legal fallout of the Volkswagen emissions scandal. "This is going to be huge. It might be the largest liability we've ever seen," Keating said. "The culpability is so clear. This is deliberate fraud and they spent a lot of time concealing it."

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Review of Books

    October 2, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour wrote an essay about the film "Straight Outta Compton" and the important role that artists like N.W.A played in telling the story of black Americans by creating what he called "a bold new language to describe the death, danger, poverty, and brutality into which they were born, and from which few escape." "Politically relevant black urban poets and N-word virtuosos like Tupac Shakur, N.W.A, and Ice Cube vividly illustrate how people use words, sometimes the very same word, to embrace or push away, recognize or deny, others. In the hands of these profane poets, 'gangsta rap' is N-word-laden oppositional political discourse," Armour wrote.

  • Valerie Barreiro

    Annenberg TV News

    September 30, 2015

    Re: Valerie Barreiro

    Valerie Barreiro was quoted about Facebook privacy settings and terms of use. "We've gotten so accustomed to just accepting terms of use," Barreiro said. "We're often doing it on the go or while we're multitasking, but the fact that it's easy to execute doesn't mean that the rights that you're giving up are any less important than the rights that you would be giving up if you were sitting at a desk reading it and signing it on the dotted line."

  • Niels W. Frenzen

    Quartz

    September 30, 2015

    Re: Niels W. Frenzen

    Niels Frenzen was cited about the lack of a unified European response to Syria's refugee crisis. Frenzen used the Dublin Regulation as an example of an international policy for which compliance is only recommended, not mandatory. The European Union law identifies which member state has responsibility for a refugee's asylum claim.

  • Edward McCaffery

    CNN.com

    September 29, 2015

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery wrote an op-ed about Donald Trump's proposed tax reforms. "Like his fellow Republicans, Trump is almost certainly playing fast and loose with the math of the matter -- a whiff of voodoo is in the air," McCaffery wrote. "We cannot count on lower rates and more revenue as a handy combination of phrases to avoid actual thinking and making hard decisions about tax and spending systems. There is however one thing we can keep counting on -- the rich are not going to see their taxes raised by one Donald Trump. It's still morning in America for the wealthy."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    The New York Times

    September 29, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Donald Trump's tax proposal. Trump's plan is not completely illogical, but then again, "a broken clock is right twice a day," Kleinbard said. He added that he likes Trump's proposal to tax companies' foreign earnings at the time they are earned, just like domestic profits.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    TaxProf Blog

    September 29, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was mentioned for signing an open letter to members of Congress to "raise significant concerns about legislative proposals that would seek to close a six-year funding shortfall in the Highway Trust Fund by taxing $2.1 trillion in U.S. corporate offshore profits at a significant discount that would overhaul the way U.S. corporations would be taxed on their future offshore profits."

  • Gregory Keating

    KNX 1070 News Radio

    September 28, 2015

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed about the fallout from Volkswagen's emissions-cheating scandal.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Sinclair Broadcast Group

    September 28, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Donald Trump's tax proposal. "It's very clear the highest income Americans will come out ahead of this plan, and it's not at all clear what -- if anything -- this plan will do for lower-income Americans," Kleinbard said. "It's designed to catch eyes but doesn't give enough detail. If you want to take credit for being substantive, then you've got to be substantive."

  • Edward McCaffery

    The Los Angeles Times

    September 28, 2015

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery was quoted about Donald Trump's proposal to reduce or eliminate many tax loopholes and deductions. Elimination of some deductions, like the one for state and local taxes, could adversely affect people in high-tax states like California, McCaffery said. "The devil is in the unspecified details," he said.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    NPR

    September 28, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about tax plans proposed by Republican presidential candidates, including attempting to simplify the tax code by reducing the number of different brackets. "The number of brackets has an almost imperceptible effect on the complexity of tax law as it is lived by the individual taxpayer," Kleinbard said. "Taxpayers are not, left to their own devices, engaged in high-level mathematics."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    TIME

    September 28, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Donald Trump's proposal to allow corporations to bring earnings back to the U.S. from overseas while paying lower rates on them, presumably with the requirement that the money be spent creating jobs. "Money is fungible, and it’s very easy for multinational companies to find ways around these rules," Kleinbard said.

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    Cincinnati Enquirer

    September 24, 2015

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen was quoted about the resignation of Kroger's chief operating officer, who was paid $2.7 million to retire and signed non-disclosure and non-disparagement agreements. "It's very common – it sounds like somebody might have been upset and the company wanted to protect its reputation," Rasmussen said, adding that the size of the payment was in line with Ellis' former position in the executive suite.

  • David B. Cruz

    The Bay Area Reporter

    September 24, 2015

    Re: David B. Cruz

    David Cruz gave the keynote address at San Francisco State University's Constitution Day conference. Cruz spoke about the increasing momentum behind the marriage equality movement and discussed areas where the LGBT movement still needs to push for social justice, such as youth homelessness. "It was an honor to be giving this presentation here in San Francisco," Cruz said. "As a home of early domestic partner legislation, and the spiritual capital of the LGBT movement in the U.S., giving this talk to a broad range of audience members at SFSU with its history of activism was a great honor."

  • Susan Estrich

    The Star Democrat

    September 23, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich wrote an op-ed about the politics of funding Planned Parenthood. "Shutting down the whole government like this, something the Republicans have done before (and paid the political price for) makes even less sense here than it did when Republicans were playing games with Obamacare, closing the government down even though there was no chance that doing so would undo the Affordable Care Act," Estrich wrote. "In this case, there isn’t even a plan to bring up similar legislation in the Senate, where there seem to be a few more grown-ups (although unfortunately, none of them are running for president)."

  • Dan Nabel

    KPCC-FM

    September 15, 2015

    Re: Dan Nabel

    Dan Nabel was interviewed on "AirTalk" about a recent court decision in favor of a mother who received a DMCA takedown notice after posting a video to YouTube of her baby dancing to copyrighted music. "The tricky thing about fair use is that as technology changes, some of the hard questions in figuring out whether something is fair use can change too," Nabel said. "When we have questions about what's happening on YouTube, these are questions that didn't exist 20 years ago, so the law sometimes has to play catch-up in figuring out how to resolve these fair use questions."

  • Dan Nabel

    Bloomberg News

    September 10, 2015

    Re: Dan Nabel

    Dan Nabel was quoted about copyrighted software and hardware restrictions that manufacturers use to lock consumers out of performing do-it-yourself repairs and maintenance on everything from mobile phones to tractors. The idea that big companies can limit control over private property "really pisses people off," Nabel said. Public outrage, he said, will "snowball into the will of the people to get something done."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Los Angeles Times

    September 8, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    A story about law school accreditation by the State Bar of California mentioned that nationally accredited law schools like the USC Gould School of Law are required to maintain a minimum 75 percent bar passage rate in three out of five years to remain in good standing. USC Gould has a 90 percent average bar passage rate for the last five years.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    AttitudeLive

    September 3, 2015

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was featured in a documentary about her experiences living with schizophrenia. "There is a lot of stigma, a lot of misinformation. I think people believe that people with schizophrenia can't live independently and can't work and are going to basically sit in a day room watching a blaring TV at best, and at worst they're going to go out and shoot up a movie theater and kill lots of people. So there's a lot of negative stereotypes, and that's hard for those of us that suffer with those illnesses, to think 'Oh this person is scared of me, how horrible,'" Saks said. "I think we should provide people the treatment resources that will help them live full, whole and productive lives. We should educate the public about what mental illness looks like and how they can help. We should encourage people who start having symptoms to seek help, and for their friends to encourage them to seek help."

  • Jody David Armour

    The Los Angeles Times

    September 3, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about a federal judge's decision to overturn the NFL's four-game suspension of New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady for the "Deflategate" controversy. "As beloved as Tom Brady is, this wasn't just a victory for a particular player," Armour said. "This case says you can't discipline people without fair process. That means the person gets notice of the kind of behavior that will constitute a violation and trigger sanctions, that the person gets notice of what those sanctions will be, and there's a fair and impartial decision maker at the appellate level and the original hearing level. Those kinds of guarantees must be provided."

  • Jody David Armour

    NBC News

    September 3, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on the Today Show about five members of a women's college soccer team who were suspended for a game after posting a photo of them wearing blackface while dressed as the Jackson 5. "When you're talking about students, especially 17, 18, 19-year-old kids, we can't just be punitive toward them, we have to take opportunities to teach," Armour said. "These are very teachable moments, and the administration recognized that."

  • Edward McCaffery

    CNN.com

    September 2, 2015

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery wrote an op-ed about Donald Trump's tax reform proposals. "The Donald, in his typical staccato style, has started to spit out fragments of ideas about reforming taxes in America; specifically, lowering the corporate tax rate, eliminating gift and estate or so-called death taxes, and -- wait for this one -- raising taxes on the wealthy," McCaffery wrote. He added that Trump has a long way to go in providing details, but that he "ought to be applauded for throwing out some ideas -- any ideas -- about fundamentally fixing America's flawed tax system. None of the many other Republican candidates seeking the presidency has done anything truly resembling that."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Financial Times

    September 1, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Etsy transferring some intellectual property assets to an Irish subsidiary. He said such transfers of intellectual property to Ireland by multinationals “in general are motivated entirely by tax reduction agendas...Etsy has a special concern that it is a B Corp designed to advertise to the world that is has morals that are ‘higher than the marketplace’,” Kleinbard added. “So to argue that it is compliant with marketplace standards does not seem to me to be really responsive to the higher standards it holds for itself.”

  • Jody David Armour

    KPCC-FM

    August 31, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "AirTalk" about the Black Lives Matter movement and recent shootings involving police. "It is an important moment in police-community relationships, but we need to forthrightly confront the fact that there are problems in the police department, as we did in L.A. in 2000 when we had the D.O.J. step in after the Rampart scandal, and I think relationships between the police and the community have improved greatly since I've been in L.A.," Armour said.

  • Heidi Rummel

    KCRW

    August 31, 2015

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel was interviewed about an upcoming hearing before the 9th circuit court of appeals to consider a lower court ruling that struck down California's death penalty law as unconstitutional.

  • Dan Simon

    KPCC-FM

    August 28, 2015

    Re: Dan Simon

    Dan Simon was interviewed on "Air Talk" discussing police body camera policies. Despite opposition to allowing police officers to review body camera footage prior to filing their reports, doing so would be beneficial because the human memory is often faulty, he said.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Los Angeles Times

    August 28, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    A story about proposed new rules for unaccredited law schools mentioned that nationally accredited schools like USC Gould must disclose attrition rates.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Daily Trojan

    August 25, 2015

    Re: Randol Schoenberg

    Randy Schoenberg was featured for the story of his landmark Supreme Court case to help a Jewish refugee reclaim Nazi-looted art from the Austrian government, which was made into the feature film "Woman in Gold," starring Ryan Reynolds and Helen Mirren. "[The case] was fun to talk about at cocktail parties, but everyone thought I was tilting at windmills and that it was completely insane," Schoenberg said. "And it was, but sometimes those things pay off, and I was very lucky that it did."

  • Emily Ryo

    KPCC-FM

    August 24, 2015

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed on "Take Two" about the California TRUST Act, which outlines when a suspect can be turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "The key change that was brought about by the TRUST Act is that local law enforcement agencies' handling of immigration detainers is no longer discretionary because the TRUST Act limits who may be held by state and local agencies at the request of ICE, narrowing it to people with serious criminal records," Ryo said.

  • Scott Altman

    The Detroit News

    August 24, 2015

    Re: Scott Altman

    Scott Altman was quoted about whether text messages allegedly sent to two Michigan state legislators, which threatened to expose their relationship unless they resigned from office, amount to criminal blackmail or extortion. Altman noted that Michigan's blackmail and extortion law allows prosecution for a threat to expose a crime, to threaten injury to a person or property, or "with intent to compel the person so threatened to do or refrain from doing any act against his will."

  • Dan Simon

    The Los Angeles Times

    August 24, 2015

    Re: Dan Simon

    Dan Simon co-authored an op-ed on police body camera policies. Despite opposition to allowing police officers to review body camera footage prior to filing their reports, doing so would be beneficial because the human memory is often faulty, Simon and his co-author wrote. "The heightened accountability might also nudge officers with violent dispositions out of the force, and thus make way for more amenable candidates," they wrote.

  • Susan Estrich

    Fox News

    August 22, 2015

    Re: Susan Estrich

    Susan Estrich was interviewed about the controversy over Hillary Clinton's emails. "It's not killing her, but it's certainly not helping her," Estrich said. "The usual rule in politics is that when you've got a bad story ... like Geraldine Ferraro's taxes ... she had one big press conference with 20 years of tax returns and hundreds and hundreds of pages, and the whole thing went away in one day because there was nothing really there. The Clintons have adopted the diametrically opposite approach ... and for the life of me, I'm not sure I understand why."

  • Emily Ryo

    Tucson Sentinel

    August 21, 2015

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was quoted about why some immigrants cross from Mexico to the U.S. illegally, in response to Donald Trump's plan to eliminate "birthright citizenship" to reduce illegal immigration. "None of those female migrants have ever mentioned the desire for birthright citizenship for their children as the reason for their decision to migrate to the U.S.," she said. "[I]nstead, lack of employment opportunities and/or violence in their home communities, and family reunification have been the most frequently cited reasons among my research subjects."

  • Niels W. Frenzen

    KPCC-FM

    August 21, 2015

    Re: Niels W. Frenzen

    Niels Frenzen was quoted about the plight of Salvadorans fleeing gang violence in Central America to seek asylum in the United States. "Judges, asylum officers, the U.S. government just don’t know what to make of gangs. The argument that a lot of advocates are making is that these are de facto governments," Frenzen said. "The legal protections that were drafted were drafted from a European perspective dealing with the post-World War II situation. No one could imagine [gangs like] MS-13, no one could imagine 18th Street."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    CNN Money

    August 20, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about Hillary Clinton's proposal to promote long-term investing through changes in the tax code. "Hillary's plan is complicated and doesn't serve any purpose," Kleinbard said.

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Sentinel

    August 20, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about the 50th anniversary of the Watts riots. "It was a critically important event. Fifty years later, we're trying to learn and go forward with the lessons from the past," Armour said. "One of the important ideas that came out was how to think about the problems. Are they problems of lack of personal responsibility or is it rather structural and systemic problems? These two create very different sets of solutions."

  • Deborah Call

    U.S. News & World Report

    August 18, 2015

    Re: Deborah Call

    Deborah Call and a USC Gould student were quoted in a story that featured the online LL.M. program offered by USC Gould. "With our program, what we have found is that the students we have enrolled are typically working," Call said. "They find that their ability to take the classes online and generally on a part-time basis really serves their purposes." Viviana Sforza, a part-time student originally from Italy, said she selected USC Gould's online program to ensure that she was receiving the same education as she would on campus.

  • Jody David Armour

    KCRW

    August 17, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "Press Play" about the passing of Julian Bond, a civil rights pioneer and former head of the NAACP, and the state of the NAACP today. "[The NAACP] did a lot to dismantle formal inequality," Armour said. "The question, though, is did it do enough to tackle the problems of economic inequality, structural inequality, and it's subject to some criticisms there. It seemed to have helped the black bourgeoisie middle class, but truly disadvantaged blacks don't seem to have gotten much better in their plight over the last 50 years despite the NAACP's victories."

  • Jody David Armour

    The Huffington Post

    August 17, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about why attending college fails to close the racial wealth gap. "My concern is about keeping a tight connection between the American dream and legitimate means to that end, to that dream. What we're finding is that one of the traditional legitimate means, education that's supposed to help us all live the Horatio Alger story, isn't as effective when it comes to black and Latino folks as it is to other folks," Armour said. "Suddenly you have to wonder if maybe you're making a wise investment of your time and energy to go down that road if there's a cruel hoax perhaps waiting at the end of it."

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Yahoo News

    August 14, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was quoted about speculation that Google's newly created holding company, Alphabet, was created for special tax purposes. "I don't get what they're hinting at," Kleinbard said. "The company is still (based in the) U.S., and foreign earnings remain subject to all the same rules."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Los Angeles Times

    August 11, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    USC Gould School of Law was mentioned in a story about a push by California legislators to require the state's unaccredited law schools to follow the lead of nationally accredited schools like USC and UCLA by disclosing information including graduation and dropout rates and alumni employment.

  • Jody David Armour

    KPFK-FM

    August 10, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "Uprising with Sonali" about the 50th anniversary of the Watts riots and its connections with protests in Ferguson, Mo. "Fifty years ago, police encountered a community of black folks who are disproportionately poor and concentrated in desperate circumstances, disproportionately turning into desperate undertakings, by the way, like crime," Armour said. "Crime is real in the black community, and so police are wrestling with a real problem, but they're wrestling with it in a heavy-handed way from the community's standpoint. They're being overbroad, they're racially profiling, they're coming down on people who don't need to be come down on, and that has triggered the same kinds of tensions and rebellions from 50 years ago just a year ago with Ferguson."

  • Gillian Hadfield

    Daily Journal

    August 6, 2015

    Re: Gillian Hadfield

    Gillian Hadfield was quoted about the legal industry's potential uses for automated systems like IBM's ROSS, a legal spin-off of the Watson supercomputer. Hadfield said that fear over automated systems robbing employees of man hours is "widespread," in all fields, not just in the field of law, and has been for some time. "I do think that this will further erode the demand for entry-level associates in larger corporate law firms. That's a segment that's already under real pressure - from legal process outsourcing, automated document processing and so on," she said.

  • Michael Chasalow

    The Los Angeles Times

    August 4, 2015

    Re: Michael Chasalow

    Michael Chasalow was quoted about the White House's support of diversity among entrepreneurs. "There are so many people who would be good in business and with a little push educationally and financially are able to cross over those obstacles," he said.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Bloomberg News

    August 3, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    The USC Gould School of Law was mentioned for its financial support of recent graduates by funding the salaries at some legal positions.

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    CardHub

    July 30, 2015

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen was quoted about the use of an automatic stay in declaring bankruptcy, which immediately suspends most collection efforts against debtors and their property. "Those who file for bankruptcy should be aware of the breadth of the stay, what it covers and what it does not," Rasmussen said. "Also, it makes little sense for a debtor to make a payment right before filing if the underlying debt would be subject to the stay."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Wall Street Journal

    July 30, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    USC Gould School of Law alum Patrick Boyle '14 was quoted about his experience working at a position with the Arizona attorney general's office funded by a stipend from USC. The stipend "let me get in the door" at a place that wouldn’t have hired him otherwise, he said. Government organizations "don’t really want to subsidize training if they don’t have to."

  • Lisa Klerman

    KALW-FM

    July 29, 2015

    Re: Lisa Klerman

    Lisa Klerman was interviewed on "Your Legal Rights" about mediating labor and employment law disputes. "In an arbitration, the third party neutral is acting like a private judge, and the arbitrator issues a binding decision. It means that you're stuck with what that arbitrator rules," Klerman said. "In mediation, a mediator does not rule in favor of one side or the other, doesn't decide who wins or how much is awarded. A mediator helps both sides reach a decision that works for both sides, and it's only if it works for both sides that there is an agreement."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Wall Street Journal

    July 27, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    USC Gould School of Law was mentioned as one of the best recognized law schools in California

  • Jody David Armour

    Vice

    July 24, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about new legal developments regarding Bill Cosby and allegations of sexual assault. "It's going to have a huge impact. It corroborates the claims of plaintiffs and those who allege that they've been victimized by Bill Cosby," Armour said. "The [2005] deposition doesn't prove that he non-consensually gave women Quaaludes or any other drug as part of sex. But [it does] establish that he does mix sex and drugs and considers it a kind of acceptable and ordinary practice for him. It is powerfully corroborative of their essential claims that something like that may have gone on in their cases."

  • Jonathan Handel

    ABC 7 Los Angeles

    July 24, 2015

    Re: Jonathan Handel

    Jonathan Handel was interviewed about an antitrust case involving major Hollywood studios operating in the E.U. "This is a direct challenge to the international business model within Europe for the American media companies," Handel said. "The issue in this case is whether the E.U. is a single market, as they contend, or a collection of countries."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Daily Journal

    July 24, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    USC Gould School of Law alumnus Mark A. Young was mentioned as President Obama's latest nominee to serve as a federal judge in the Central District. "If you can manage the stress, it's a great experience," Young said of his time at USC Law.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Daily Journal

    July 24, 2015

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Holly Farless, a rising 3L at USC Gould School of Law, co-wrote an op-ed about recent legislation that would address "no-injury" class action lawsuits. "Proponents of the act say that by limiting classes to members with similar injuries, plaintiffs who have actually suffered harm will avoid having their claims diluted or, even worse, precluded by the inclusion of uninjured class members," Farless wrote. "Similarly, defendants will not be forced to defend against, or overpay to resolve, claims brought by a largely uninjured class."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Daily Journal

    July 23, 2015

    Re: Daniel Brenner

    Daniel Brenner wrote an op-ed about the admissibility of credit card statements in debt collection cases under the business records exception to the hearsay rule. "Admission of credit card statements is often critical to establishing a defendant's debt," Brenner wrote. "A plaintiff debt buyer may show it has good title to a debt with the defendant's name on it, but more is needed. Credit card bills mailed to the defendant that go unchallenged can establish that an account is truly stated."

  • Dan Nabel

    Daily Journal

    July 22, 2015

    Re: Dan Nabel

    Dan Nabel was quoted about a state appellate court decision to affirm the conviction of a juvenile on two counts of possessing firearms based on a photo from the teenager's Instagram account. "The court was saying we don't necessarily have to have someone in the room. It makes it easier for prosecution and law enforcement to catch people doing this sort of thing," Nabel said. "If all you have is an Instagram photo, that might not be a good thing, but if it's just one of many pieces of evidence that's being used to charge someone with a crime, I don't see that as a problem at all."

  • Clare Pastore

    Daily Journal

    July 21, 2015

    Re: Clare Pastore

    Clare Pastore was quoted about a California Supreme Court decision to uphold a default judgment against an attorney who gave conflicting excuses in attempts to reverse the judgment. "If your attorney messes up, your remedy is against that attorney in a malpractice action," Pastore said. "Those states put a high premium on finality. California is more lenient, but here the Supreme Court is saying, 'Don't come in with one story the first time and another the second time.'" "It is breathtaking to me, extraordinary to me, that this lawyer would have the chutzpah to try that," she added.

  • Jody David Armour

    MSNBC

    July 16, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on "NewsNation" about the disproportionate incarceration of black men and President Obama's push for criminal justice reform. "In some of our neighborhoods ... up to 90 percent of young black males are going to wind up in jail, on probation or on parole at some point in their lives. That's staggering," Armour said. "We're talking about the equivalent of maybe a thousand Hurricane Katrinas hitting a thousand Ninth Wards in terms of the damage that's been inflicted on the black community over the last 30 years as a result of mass incarceration."

  • Michael Brennan

    Daily Journal

    July 14, 2015

    Re: Michael Brennan

    Michael Brennan was quoted about shifts in criminal justice reform in light of President Obama's visit to a federal prison. "We've been dealing with incredibly harsh sentencing guidelines with respect to narcotics going on 30 years, and Obama has finally decided that they need to be changed, and this is his way of continuing to get that message out," Brennan said. "He can't do it himself, obviously, but he's trying to put pressure on Congress and the U.S. Sentencing Commission to change those sentencing guidelines even further."

  • Edward Finegan

    The Chronicle of Higher Education

    July 9, 2015

    Re: Edward Finegan

    A story cited a recent presentation by Edward Finegan about the definition of the word "gender" and its relevance to a legal case about a pre-operative transgendered student who was born biologically male and applied to college as a female. The college dismissed the student on the grounds of fraud. "In understanding and resolving such disputes," Finegan said, "substantial value resides in consulting both established, reputable dictionaries and those that are crowdsourced."

  • Lisa Klerman

    The Information

    July 9, 2015

    Re: Lisa Klerman

    Lisa Klerman was cited about a rise in workplace discrimination complaints against tech companies. She said that the uptick could simply be the result of more hiring and, therefore, more opportunities for lawsuits. Or, she said, high profile judgments in favor of plaintiffs could be encouraging more people to come forward.

  • Jody David Armour

    The Wrap

    July 8, 2015

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted about the public release of a deposition in which comedian Bill Cosby admitted to acquiring sedatives to give to young women. Armour called the deposition "a smoking gun" in a defamation lawsuit brought against Cosby by three of his alleged victims. "It will corroborate the accusers' claims that he actually did what they said he did," Armour said. "If we get to the defamation trial, these statements made by him in the deposition … suddenly, their claim looks like a sure winner, and he's looking not only at compensatory damages, but probably serious punitive damages."

  • Lisa Klerman

    Los Angeles Daily News

    July 1, 2015

    Re: Lisa Klerman

    Lisa Klerman was quoted about a racial and disability discrimination case filed against the city of Los Angeles by a former park groundskeeper. Klerman said the case is "rare" not only because the plaintiff is white, but because there is direct evidence of racial discrimination. Usually, discrimination allegations are decided based on "who is more believable," she said.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Daily Journal

    July 1, 2015

    Re: Elizabeth Armour

    Elizabeth Armour was quoted about the decision by international firm Quinn Emanuel to drastically reduce its recruitment of rising 3L students for summer positions. Armour said because the firm only does litigation, it "has a different hiring profile" from many large law firms. It is looking "for more robust, mature skills" that take more time in law school or in clerkships to develop, she said.

  • Sam Erman

    Vice

    July 1, 2015

    Re: Sam Erman

    Sam Erman was quoted about the politics of appointing Supreme Court justices and how the next president could change the makeup of the court. "They have the job for life, so they don't have to worry about politics in the way that other powerful members of the government have to," Erman said. "So even though their decisions seem political to us, I think that the justices are committed to the notion of legality." "Even if everyone is appointed at the same age, their tenures on the court will be longer. So these influential moments for presidents [to nominate justices] may become farther and farther between," he added.

  • Lisa Klerman

    Contra Costa Times

    July 1, 2015

    Re: Lisa Klerman

    Lisa Klerman was quoted about a racial and disability discrimination case filed against the city of Los Angeles by a former park groundskeeper. Klerman said the case is "rare" not only because the plaintiff is white, but because there is direct evidence of racial discrimination. Usually, discrimination allegations are decided based on "who is more believable," she said.

  • Thomas D. Lyon

    CBS Los Angeles KCBS-TV

    July 1, 2015

    Re: Thomas D. Lyon

    Tom Lyon was featured for his research which influenced a recent Supreme Court decision that will allow children’s statements to teachers about potential abuse to be submitted as evidence. In his written opinion, Justice Samuel Alito cited work done by Lyon and USC students over the last decade. "It was a terrific feeling to see work that I’ve been doing for years to not only influence the court but to influence in a way that I think will really help children," Lyon said.

  • David B. Cruz

    PBS

    July 1, 2015

    Re: David B. Cruz

    David Cruz was interviewed on "Tavis Smiley" about the impact of a series of recent Supreme Court rulings, including decisions on same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. "I think that it's going to be the highest salience, that the many candidates in the Republican field and the handful of Democratic candidates are going to be engaging with this. The further right a Republican candidate is going to be, the bigger a bulls-eye they're going to paint on the Supreme Court, due to decisions like the Obamacare decision and the decision for marriage for same-sex couples," Cruz said.

  • Edward Kleinbard

    Ars Technica

    July 1, 2015

    Re: Edward Kleinbard

    Edward Kleinbard was cited about Chicago’s new tax on online services, including Netflix and other online providers of movies, music and games. Kleinbard said he had never heard of such a tax anywhere else in the United States.

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